Judy Seidman

b. Connecticut, USA, 1951. Lives in Johannesburg. 
Judy Ann Seidman’s art flows from the twinned beliefs that “culture is a weapon of struggle”, and that “the personal is political” – an approach to culture born in Africa’s liberation struggles. Her paintings, drawings and graphics explore personal and collective experience, emotion, belief and vision; speaking of and to people’s movements, from national liberation and worker struggles to feminism and HIV activism.

Education

1973: Master of Arts, Fine Art (Painting), University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA
1971: Bachelor of Arts, Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)

2019: Drawn Lines, Museum Africa, Johannesburg.

[accordion title="Group Exhibitions (International)"]

2005: Na Cidade, Jazz, Luanda, Angola.
1984: Botswana National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1980: Judy Ann Seidman and Pitika Ntuli, Pentonville Gallery, London.
1980: Judy Ann Seidman and Pitika Ntuli, Institute of Education Gallery, University of London, London.
1976: Hemingway Art Gallery, New York.
1976: Botswana National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone.
1975: Exhibition of paintings and drawings, British Council, Lusaka, Zambia
1974: Exhibition of paintings and drawings, National Library, Lusaka.
1973: Masters of Fine Art exhibition, University of Wisconsin Art Gallery, Wisconsin.

Workshops, Arts Facilitation & Policy

2016 - present: Facilitator, Feminist Women's Art Network, One in Nine campaign, South Africa.
2008 - 2012: Facilitator, One in Nine advocacy media and Naledi Ya Meso art-making and gender workshops, CDP Trust, Johannesburg.
2007 - present: Facilitator, Khulumani Art Healing and Heritage Workshops, South Africa.
1996 - 1997: Member, Curriculum 2005 Arts and Culture Learning Area Committee, Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology, South Africa.
1996: Consultant, “Respect for Cultural Diversity” curriculum, South African National Defence Force civic education programme, South Africa.
1995 - 1996: Member, Arts Education Policy Task Team, Gauteng Ministry of Education, South Africa.
1994 - 1995: Sub-committee member, Visual Arts of National Education and Training Forum curriculum development, South Africa.
1994 - 1995: Chairperson, Strategic Management Team, Gauteng Department of Sport, Recreation, Arts, Culture, South Africa.
1993: Curriculum development, Dakawa Arts and Crafts school, Grahamstown.
1991 - 2001: Consultant, Curriculum Development Project for the Creative Arts, Johannesburg.
1988 - 1990: Cultural Studies curriculum development, Foundation for Education with Production, Botswana and Zimbabwe.
1985 - 1989: Graphics editor and training supervisor, Mmegi wa Dikgang, Botswana.
1978 - 1983: Teacher, Thokoza School, Mbabane, Swaziland
1978 - 1983: Teacher, Maru-a-Pula Secondary School, Gaborone.

Publications

2017: Drawn Lines, an autobiography of Judy Ann Seidman, Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, California.
2013: Justice, redress and restitution: Voices of the widows of the Marikana Massacre, Khulumani Support Group, Johannesburg.
2011: Naledi Ya Meso Handbook, Curriculum Development Project Trust, Johannesburg.
2011: Art as Advocacy Handbook, Curriculum Development Project Trust, Johannesburg.
2010: One Woman, Sketches/diaries, letters/notes: Fragments from Anita Parkhurst Willcox, Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, California.
2007: Katorus Stories, South African History Archive, Johannesburg.
2007: Red on Black, the story of the South African Poster Movement, STE Publishers, Johannesburg.
2005: Hlanganani Basebensi: A brief history of COSATU, STE Publishers, Johannesburg.
2005: Every worker a union member, COSATU Collective, Johannesburg.
2002: My Comrade with AIDS is still my Comrade, COSATU Collective, Johannesburg.
2001: The Social Protection handbook, COSATU Collective, Johannesburg.
1993: Fighting AIDS, National Progressive Primary Health Care Network booklet, South Africa.
1991: Images of Defiance: Protest Posters from South Africa 1980 - 1990, Raven Press (Written together with Posterbook Collective), Johannesburg.
1990: In Our Own Image, (textbook for  secondary school level Cultural Studies for Southern Africa), FEP, Gaborone.
1979: Bayezwa: Paintings and drawings of Southern Africa, South End Press, Boston.

Writing

2016: National liberation is necessarily an act of culture: Visual arts of the armed struggle in Southern Africa, paper given at Conference Politics of the Armed Struggle in Southern Africa
2013: Khulumani! Talking to the concept, structure and outcomes of Khulumani Support Group’s Art, Healing and Heritage Workshops, paper by Judy Seidman and Nomarussia Bonasa for Khulumani Support Group at Dance for Life conference.
2010: The Art of National Liberation; Thami Mnyele and Medu Art Ensemble retrospective, Thami + Medu exhibition catalogue, Johannesburg Art Gallery and Jacana Press, Johannesburg.
2010: Education for liberation, Chimurenga magazine, Cape Town.
2006: Drawn Lines: Belief, Emotion, and Aesthetic in the South African Poster Movement in Phillippa Hobbs, ed. "Messages and Meaning: the MTN art collection", MTN, Johannesburg.
2004: South African Art Historians, with Jillian Carman, paper on South African Poster Movement, Durban.
1997: Imagery and AIDS in South Africa, paper presented to Images and Empire conference in Yale University, Connecticut.
1992 - 1994: Africa South and East, Johannesburg.
1986 - 1989: Medu Art Ensemble Newsletter, Gaborone.

Other

2006 - 2008: Curator, Poster Collection, South African History Archive, Johannesburg.
2004: Specialist advisor, Images of Defiance, MuseumAfrica, Johannesburg.
1995 - 1997: Executive member, Arts and Culture Alliance, Gauteng.
1994 - 1995: Executive member, Arts Educators Association, Gauteng.
1981 - 1985: Member, Medu Art Ensemble, Gaborone.

Collections

Botswana National Museum and Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana
Mayibuye Centre, Cape Town, South Africa
MTN collection, Johannesburg, South Africa
Museum of Revolutionary Art, Leningrad, Soviet Union
Museum of Modern Art, New York
South African History Archive, Johannesburg, South Africa

Nkoali Nawa

b. 1965, Goldfields, South Africa. Lives in Gugulethu, Cape Town
Nkoali Nawa started out as a gold mineworker, before moving into art-making. In doing so, he obtained a diploma and degree in fine art from Technikon Free State. His drawing and painting works depict the daily struggles of impoverished South African communities, the harsh working conditions of miners, as well as the intergenerational distress caused by the colonial structure of migrant labour systems. 

Art Education


2001: National Diploma, Fine Arts and B. Tech, Technikon Free State, Bloemfontein.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2008: Space, Association for Visual Arts (AVA), Cape Town.
2002: Close-Up, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2020: Latitudes Art Fair Online, The Creative Block by Spuer Arts Trust, online.
2018: Rituals, Association for Visual Arts (AVA), Cape Town; Bashu Uhuru Freedom Festival, Johannesburg.
2007: Group Exhibition, Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg.
2006: Group Exhibition, Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg
2004: Heike Davies, Nkoali Nawa and Committee Work, Association for Visual Arts (AVA), Cape Town.
2004: Exhibition, Apartheid Museum, Johannesburg
2003: The Brett Kabbel Art Awards, Cape Town International Convention Centre
2003: Members' Exhibition, Association for Visual Arts (AVA), Cape Town
2003: Group Exhibition, SA National Gallery Annexe, Cape Town.
2002: South African International Trade Exhibition (SAITEX), Johannesburg.
2002: Group Exhibition, Constitution Hill, Johannesburg.
2002: Outdoor gallery (Billboard), Johannesburg.
2002: Group Exhitbition, Fordsburg artists studios, Johannesburg.
2001: Group Exhibition, DC art gallery, Cape Town.
2001: Group Exhibition, Spaza art gallery, Johannesburg.
1998: Annual student art exhibition, Central university of technology, Bloemfontein.
1995: Annual student art exhibition, Central university of technology, Bloemfontein.

Group Exhibitions (international)


2013: Our Daily Work/ Our Daily Lives, Michigan State University Museum (MSUM), East Lansing.
2006: L’atelier, Renault Show Room, Paris.
2004: The ID of South African Artists, Fortis Circus Theater, Scheveningen.

Artist Residency


2018: Nando's Creative Exchange, Cape Town.
2002: Bag Factory Visiting Artist, Johannesburg, & Greatmore Art Studios, Cape Town.

Awards


2003: National Finalist, The Brett Kebble Awards, Cape Town.

Commissions


Murals: Mineworker Development Agency; National Union of Mineworkers South Africa (NUMSA); Coca-Cola South Africa.
Book illustrations and covers: Human Rights Media Centre; Keels Publisher.
Report Covers: Labour Research Service; Ditikini Investment Company annual&nbsp.
Artwork: Community House, Salt River.

Other Work


1996 – 2003: Art Lecturer and teacher, various schools and institutions, South Africa.

Texts

Mpumelelo Melane

b. 1962, New Brighton, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
Mpumelelo Melane is a sculptor, who carved wooden figures in his spare time while working in posts as a labourer. After receiving chisels and some career advice from a man called Tom Ungerer in the 1980s, Melane joined Imvaba Association, and later went to Cape Town, where he trained at the Community Arts Project (CAP). Melane’s sculptures are largely portraits and figurative representations of people.

Education


1990: Training Art Course for cultural workers, Community Arts Project, Cape Town.
1988: Imvaba Arts Association.
1980s: Fine Arts, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth (incomplete)

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


1992: Visual Arts Group travelling exhibition, Centre for African Studies, University of Cape Town, Cape Town.
1992: Grahamstown Arts Festival, Grahamstown.

Group Exhibitions (International)


1990: Touring exhibition, United Kingdom and Denmark.

Other


2003 - 2005: Art Facilitator, Siyaya Centre for Young Arts
1990: Delegate, Zabalaza Festival, London [Created mural at the Institute of Contemporary Arts with other South African delegates (among them Thami Jali, Sophie Peters, Louise Almon, Helen Sebidi).]

Links

Thami Jali

b. 1955, Lamontville, Durban.
Thami Jali is a painter, ceramicist and printmaker. As an alumni of the Rorke’s Drift Art & Craft Centre, he helped to re-establish the ceramics studio for their 2004 re-opening. Jali’s subject matter is as broad as his skill set, engaging areas from political life, dreams and the surreal, to forms from nature. 


Education


1983 - 1984: Ceramics, Natal Technikon, KwaZulu-Natal.
1981 - 1982: Rorke's Drift Art & Craft Centre, Kwa-Zulu Natal.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2014: Restless Spirt, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2007: Transformation, BAT Centre - Menzi Mchunu Gallery, Durban.
1998: Ungqofo Ulalele, BAT Centre - Menzi Mchunu Gallery, Durban.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2014: Retroactive, KwaZulu-Natal Society of Art (KZNSA) Gallery, Durban.
2011: Three Parts More Harmony, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: Amandla, BAT Centre - Menzi Mchunu and Democratic Galleries, Durban.
2010: Amandla, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2009: A Known Heritage, Kizo Art Gallery, Umhlanga.
2004: InniBos Kunstefees, Nelspruit.
1995: Africus: Johannesburg Biennale ’95, Johannesburg
1995: 38 Essex Road, NSA Gallery, Durban, Kwa-Zulu Natal
1994: National Arts Trust Exhibition, BAT Centre, Durban.
1992: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, Federated Union of Black Artists (FUBA) Gallery, Johannesburg.
1991: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, Federated Union of Black Artists (FUBA) Gallery, Johannesburg.
1990: Vulamehlo – Open Eye,  Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
1989: Five Friends, (Paul Sibisi, Mpolokeng Ramphomane, Sifiso kaMkame, Gordon Gabashane and Thami Jali), fka Natal Society of Art (NSA) Gallery, Durban.
1989: Objects of Utility, Federated Union of Black Artists (FUBA) Gallery, Johannesburg.
1988: Friends of Freedom, Federated Union of Black Artists (FUBA) Gallery, Johannesburg.
1980 - 1982: Festival of African Art, University of Zululand, Richards Bay.

Group Exhibitions (International)


1997: New Dehli Triennale, Lalit Kala Akademi, New Dehli.
1993: ART OMI, International Artists Workshop, New York.
1990: Art from South African Townships, Institute for Contemporary Arts, London.
1983: Art Communication, Indingilizi Gallery, Mbabane.

Workshops & Residencies


1997: Artist in Residence, Edgewood College, Wisconsin.
1990: Zabalaza Festival, Institute of Contemporary Art, London.

Awards


1982: First Prize - Sculpture, Festival of African Arts, University of Zululand, Richard's Bay.

Other


2017: Judge, PPC Imaginarium Awards, South Africa.
2004: Re-established the ceramics studio, Rorke's Drift Art & Craft Centre, Kwa-Zulu Natal.
2000: Ceramic tile project, Matsulu Art Centre, Mpumalanga. 
1991: Trustee, Community Mural Projects, Cultural Trust, Durban.
1987: Pottery and sculpture teacher, Mofolo Art Centre, Soweto.
1983 - 1984: Founder, Art Communications, Natal Technikon (now Durban University of Technology).

Public collections


Campbell Collection, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban.
Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
The Constitutional Court, Johannesburg.
University of Zululand, Richard's Bay.

Sithembiso Sangweni, Thami Jali, artist on a mission, (ASAI, 2018).
Thami Jali, Recalling Community Mural Projects, (ASAI, 2018).
Jenny Stretton, Thami Jali: Restless Spirit, (ASAI, 2018; originally published in 2014 by Durban Art Gallery).
Jenny Stretton, Thami Jali talks to curator Jenny Stretton about his vision for the future, (ASAI, 2018; originally published in 2014 by Durban Art Gallery).
Bren Brophy, Terry-Anne Stevenson reflects on an artistic life shared with Thami Jali, (ASAI, 2018; originally published in 2014 by Durban Art Gallery).
Witty Nyide, Directions to find Thami Jali (ASAI, 2018; originally published in 2014 by Durban Art Gallery).

Zamani Makhanya

b. 1959. Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Zamani Romeo Makhanya is an artist and educator. He studied fine art at the University of Fort Hare before embarking on a teaching career at the Ntuzuma College of Education. Makhanya’s works give poetic form to ideas that relate to African culture, spirituality and aesthetics.


Sophie Perryer, 10 years, 100 artists – Art in a Democratic South Africa, (Bell Roberts, Cape Town, 2004), 218-221

 

  Hayden Proud, ReVisions: Expanding the Narrative of South African Art, (UNISA Press Pretoria, 2006), 328-329

 


Art education


1985: Honours degree in Fine Art and Higher diploma in Education, University of Fort Hare, Alice

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2004: Alliance Francaise, Johannesburg.
2003: The unfolding spirit, African Art Centre, Durban.

Solo Exhibitions (International)


2004: Ibuya, Maison De L’Outre-Mer, Nantes, France.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2017: Sea Level, Artspace, Durban.
2017: Rainbow Exhibition, Duotone Gallery, Cape Town.
2015: Duotone, Cape Town International Convention Centre, Cape Town.
2013: Inkunzi Emanxeba: The legacy continues…, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: “DON’T/PANIC", Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2005: The 5 M's Exhibition, The African Art Centre, Durban.
2004: Ties That Bind, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2003: Thwasa, 3rd Eye Vision collective, KwaZulu-Natal Society of Art Gallery, Durban.
2002: Association for Visual Arts Gallery, Cape Town.
2001: Untold tales of magic: Abelumbi, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2001: Masked/Unmasked, 37 Craft Avenue, Durban.

Workshops & Residencies


2006: Thupelo Regional Workshop, Durban Cultural and Documentation Centre, Durban.

Other


2018: Judge, KwaZulu-Natal Society of Arts (KZNSA) Members' Exhibition, Durban.
1986 - 1999: Art Teacher, Ntuzuma College of Education, KwaZulu Natal.

Links

Kristin NG-Yang

Kristin NG-Yang

b. 1970 Shandong, China. Lives in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Kristin NG-Yang draws on her dual Chinese and South African identity to reflect on questions of migration, nature, agency and identity.

Art Education

Present: PhD, University of KwaZulu- Natal, KwaZulu-Natal.
2004: Master of Fine Art, University of KwaZulu-Natal, KwaZulu-Natal.
1991: Central Academy of Fine Arts (majoring in oil paint painting), Beijing. 

Solo Exhibitions

2017: Perceptions & Prejudices, The Other Room, Durban.
2016: Bird/Fish Solo Exhibition, Noeli Galley, Shanghai.
2016: Bird/Fish Solo Exhibition,National Arts Festival, Grahamstown, South Africa. 
2016: Bird/Fish Solo Exhibition, Durban Art Gallery & Rivertown Contemporary, Durban. 
2015: Kristin’s Solo Exhibition, Tamasa Gallery, Durban.
2014: Diary in South Africa, Noeli Galley, Shanghai.
2013: Living in South Africa, Noeli Galley, Shanghai.
2012: Interpretation, Alliance Francaise, Durban.
2008: Art works by Kristin Hua Yang, Fogolino Art Gallery, Trento, Italy.
2008: Art works by Kristin Hua Yang, Cassa Rurale di Pergine, Pergine, Italy.
2007: Nordic Forest, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2004: Submerged Mindscape, Tamasa Gallery, Durban.
2003: MAFA exhibition, Jack Heath Gallery, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. 
2001: Drawing and oil paintings, Jack Heath Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.

Group exhibitions


2017: Turbine Art Fair, Johannesburg. 
2017: Bird/Fish studio I (with Rory Klopper), Bird/Fish Studio, Beijing.
2016: Zhishang - Kongjian, Bird Nest Art Center, Beijing, China
2016: Zhishang - Wanwei, Ban Space, Shanghai, China
2016: Zhishang - Zhishang, National Exhibition Center, Shanghai, China
2015: Zhongshan Art Fair, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
2015: Female Art Exhibition, Naked Eye Gallery, Beijing, China
2014: LiRenWeiMei, ShangShang Art Gallery, Beijing, China
2014: Chufu, Yixing Art Space, Beijing, China
2014: ChongGouYiXiang 1, Yi Space, Beijing, China
2014: Exhale, Art Space Durban
2013: Sound From Africa, East Gallery, Guanlan, China
2013: The 2nd Chinese Young Artist selected Prints Exhibition, 798 Art Zone, Beijing & Qingdao art Gallery, Shenzhen, China
2013: What Lies Beneath, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2013: Consider China, Art Space Durban, South Africa.
2013: Chun Guang Za Xian, Yi Gallery, Beijing, China.
2012: Across the parallel lines (with Diane Victor), East Galley, Guanlan, China
2012: Lady of the Forest, Inky cuttlefish Studio, London, UK
2012: Art on Paper, Nairobi National Museum, Kenya
2011: Emerging Artist from South Africa, Pangyongjie Studio, Beijing, China
2010: 10 Years, 10 Artists, Tamasa Gallery, Durban
2010: Art exhibition, St Paul secondary school, London, U.K.
2010: Red Eye, Durban Art Gallery, Durban
2010: Woman's Day, Durban Art Gallery, Durban
2010: Jabulisa 2001, Tatham Art Gallery, Travelled to Durban, Margate, Empangeni, Eshowe Museum and Newcastle
2009: Cultural Landscapes, Turbine Hall, Johannesburg
2008: CVA exhibition of staff and graduate students, Jack Heath Gallery, Pietermaritzburg
2008: Annual members exhibition, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2007: Pure and Simple, duet exhibition at ArtSpace, Durban
2007: Intel Exhibition of Art Works, Johannesburg and Cape Town
2007: Woman's Day, Durban Art Gallery, Durban
2007: A4 from Durban, ArtSpace Berlin, Germany
2007: Annual members exhibition, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2006: Renault Artists: Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg; Renault exhibition hall, Port Elizabeth & Renault exhibition hall, Paris, France

Scholarships


2002: Top 45 Postgraduate Student Scholarship, University of KwaZulu-Natal
2010-2012: Rita Strong Scholarship
2001-2003: Rita Strong Scholarship

Wonder Buhle

b.  Kwa-Ngcolosi, KwaZulu-Natal, 1989

Wonder Buhle is a mixed-media artist whose work deals with family dynamics and the stereotypes associated with men in South Africa.

Education and Teaching


2011: Advanced apprenticeship training, Durban University of Technology, Durban.
2011: Velobala Mentorship Programme, Durban University of Technology, Durban.
2011: Drawing and painting teacher, BAT Centre, Durban.
2010: Visual Arts Residency Program, BAT Centre, Durban.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2020: COMFORT, BKhz, Johannesburg.
2018: Ukumisa Insika, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.

Solo Exhibitions (International)


2019: To Find Me, PilippZollinger Gallery, Zurich, Switzerland.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2019: the head the hand, Blank Projects, Cape Town.
2017: Looking After Freedom, Michealis gallery, Cape Town.
2017: FNB Joburg Art Fair, Johannesburg.
2016: FNB Joburg Art Fair, Johannesburg.
2015: Members exhibition, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts (KZNSA) Gallery, Durban.
2015: Blowing in the wind, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts (KZNSA) Gallery, Durban.
2015: Joburg Art Fair Fringe, Johannesburg.
2015: Henry George Gallery, Johannesburg.
2014: 50 shades of Grey, Art Eye Gallery, Johannesburg.
2014: Young Blood Gallery, Cape Town.
2014: African Art Centre, Durban.
2014: AWE, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts (KZNSA) Gallery, Durban.
2013: Misconception, Durban University of Technology, Durban.
2013: Art Eye Gallery, Johannesburg.
2013: Margate Art Museum, Margate.
2013: African Art Centre, Durban.
2012: Velobala exhibition, Durban University of Technology, Durban.
2012: ABSA L’atelier competition, Art Space Gallery, Durban.
2011: Don't Panic, Durban Art Gallery.
2011: Velobala exhibition, African Art Centre, Durban.
2011: Who am I, BAT Centre, Durban.
2011: Izikhwephazethu, Durban Art Gallery.
2010: Student exhibition, BAT Centre, Durban.

Group Exhibitions (International)


2020: The Medium is the Message, Unit London, London.
2018: In residence: Joey Chin & Buhle Wonder Mbambo, The Art House, Wakefield, United Kingdom.
2016: Bremer Burgerschaft, Bremen Parliament, Germany.
2012: Städtische Galerie, Bremen, Germany.

Public Art Projects


2014: Mural, Colgate and Palmolive, kan land, Durban.
2012: Mural, Lindelani primary school, Umlazi, KwaZulu-Natal.
2011: Mural, Inqolo Noseyili exhibition (by artist Zoro Xaba), Durban.
2011: Mural, Renewing BAT Centre, Durban.
2011: Mural, Don't Panic exhibition, behind English Market, Durban.
2010: Mosaic, Sakhithemba Centre, Ilovu, KwaZulu-Natal.

Workshops


2012: Visual Arts Network of South Africa (VANSA) Art workshop, Collective Studios (residency abroad discourse), Johannesburg.
2012: Don’t Panic facilitated by Gabi Ngcobo, Zamani Makhanye & Sfiso Ka-Mkame, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: Sculpture workshop with Danielle Ncube, BAT Centre, Durban.
2011: Art workshop (Tribute to Ernest Mancoba) curated by Lionel Davis, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: Art workshop exploring Contemporary art, Edel Studio, Bremen, Germany.

Commissions


Nandos commission.
Colgate commission.

Collections


Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
Art Eye Gallery, Johannesburg.
Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa.

Wonder Buhle's work is also included in private collections in Austria, Switzerland and the USA.

Sfiso Ka-Mkame

b. 1963, Clermont, Durban.

Sfiso Ka-Mkame first made his mark as an artist in the 1980s with his vivid evocations of the turbulence of the time. He continues to chronicle his environment, frequently tackling issues concerning violence and violence inflicted upon women. He works mostly with oil pastels, producing powerful images marked by expressive use of colour, gritty texture, and a rich delight in pattern.

Hayden Proud, ReVisions: Expanding the Narrative of South African Art, (UNISA Press Pretoria, 2006), 246 – 249

 


 
Mario Pissarra, Visual Century: South African Art in Context 1907-2007 (Vol. 3, 1973-1992), (Wits University Press, Johannesburg, 2011), 85, 88

 


Education and Teaching


1991: Aids in Canada workshop – posters for Southern Africa Education Trust Fund.
1987: Clermont Arts Society – founder member.
1986: Student teacher in Printmaking, Community Arts Workshop, Durban.
1983: Art classes, Little Abbey Theatre, Durban.
1982: Printmaking, Abangani Open School, Durban.
1979: Handicrafts and drawing, Mtwalume, High school.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2004: The African Art Centre, Durban.
2003: Association of Visual Arts (AVA) Gallery, Cape Town.
2002: The African Art Centre, Durban.
2000: The African Art Centre, Durban.
1996: Me and My Conscience, BAT Centre, Durban.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2019: Winter Group Exhibition, Melrose Gallery, Johannesburg.
2016: Beyond Binaries, Essence Festival, International Convention Centre, Durban; Durban Art Gallery.
2007: Exhibition for ‘Revisions’ book, African Art Centre, Durban.
2006: Renault selected artists
2004: Exhibition of oil pastels, African Art Centre, Durban.
2004: Ties that Bind, The Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2003: Veterans of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2002: Untold Tales of Magic – Abelumbi, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2001: Fundraising exhibition, Ruth Prowse School of Art, Cape Town.
1999: Exhibition with with Percy Konqobe, The Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg.
1999: Klein Karoo National Arts Festival, Oudtshoorn.
1999: Emergence, Durban Art Gallery, Durban; Standard Bank National Arts Festival, Grahamstown.
1990: Faith and Trust, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg.
1990: Thupelo group show, Federated Union of Black Artists (FUBA) Gallery, Johannesburg.
1988: The Neglected Tradition, Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg.
1988: Three-person exhibition, Grassroots Gallery, Westville, KwaZulu-Natal.
1987: Clermont Art Society group exhibition, Clermont Hall, Clermont, Durban.
1987: Exhibition, Paul Mikula and Associates, Durban.
1987: African Arts Festival, University of Zululand, Kwadlangezwa.
1986: Community Arts Workshop group exhibition, Café Génévè, Durban.
1986: Artists Against Conscription, Elizabeth Sneddon Theatre, Durban.

Group Exhibitions (international)


2007: Best of African Design: 100% Zulu, Oxo Gallery, London.
1997: Lifetimes: Kunst aus dem sudlichen Afrika, Out of Africa festival, Munich.
1996: Common and Uncommon Ground, South African Art to Atlanta, City Gallery East, Atlanta.
1995: Rise with the Sun, Winnipeg.
1993: Icroci del Sud: Affinities - Contemporary South African Art, 45th Venice Biennale, Venice.
1990: Art from South Africa, Museum of Modern Art, New York; Oxford.

Awards


1987: UZ African Arts festival first prize for drawing

Collections


Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg.
The Campbell Collections of the University of Natal, Durban.
Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
University of Zululand, Richards Bay.
Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
Quest International.
Mobil Oil Collection.
SASOL Art Collection.
The Carnegie Art Gallery, Newcastle.
Cape Provincial Library.
Wits Art Museum, Johannesburg.
UNISA Art Collection, Pretoria.

Links

Sithembiso Sangweni, African Phoenix: Sfiso ka-Mkame, then and now, (ASAI, 2018).
Mario Pissarra, Sfiso Ka-Mkame: Charting his own course, (ASAI, 2018; originally published in 2003 for the Africa Centre in London).
Mario Pissarra, Resilience and empathy: Sfiso Ka-Mkame at the AVA, (ASAI, 2018; originally published in 2003 for ArtThrob).
Mario Pissarra, Affirmations of humanity: Sfiso Ka-Mkame’s dialogues with himself, (ASAI, 2016).

Mthobisi Maphumulo

b. 1988, Imfume, Durban, South Africa.
Mthobisi Maphumulo is a Durban-based artist and the founder of the Amasosha Art Movement, a collective of young artists working in the city. He uses oil pastel and monoprint, making figurative imagery that is critical of capitalist social structures, like race and class. Using symbolism and layered titling, his works reflect on South Africa’s unequal economy, emphasising the social and psychological effects of dispossession and impoverishment.

Art Education


2015: Certificate in The Business of Art, Curate.A.Space, Durban.
2013: Printmaking Workshop, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2012: Certificate in Mural making, Bremen.
2010: Certificate in Visual Art, BAT Centre, Durban.
2011: Certificate, Velobala weekend art classes, African Art Centre, Durban.

Group  Exhibitions (South Africa)


2019: Articulate Africa, A4 Arts Foundation, Cape Town.
2018: Thupelo International workshop exhibition, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2017: From the horse’s mouth, Ebony gallery, Cape Town.
2017: Members group exhibition, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2016: Beyond binaries, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2016: Essence Festival, ICC, Durban.
2016: 20 Years Later: A Fresh Look at the Bill of Rights, African Art Centre, Durban.
2016: Invisible, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2015: Lessons, Nedbank, Durban.
2015: Joburg fringe, ArtsonMain, Johannesburg.
2015: After Winter, Henry George Gallery, Johannesburg.
2015: Fresh produce, Turbine Art Fair, Johannesburg.
2015: Digital art, BAT Centre, Durban.
2015: Blowing Minds, University of the Free State gallery, Bloemfontein; KZNSA gallery, Durban.
2015: Transformation, Incubation, Activation, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2014: Reflection, BAT Centre, Durban.
2014: Ababhemu, 8 Morrison Street, Durban; Grahamstown Art Festival, Grahamstown.
2014: Hilton Art Festival, Durban.
2014: Bobathathu June 16 exhibition, Sushi Corner, Durban.
2014: Awe, What you say about what?, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2014: Twenty/20 - A clear vision, Growing the Mandela Legacy, Unisa Art Gallery, Pretoria.
2014: Emerging Eyes, African Art Centre, Durban.
2013: Group Exhibition, The Collective art gallery, Durban.
2013: Group Exhibition, Wushwini Art and Culture Heritage Centre, Durban.
2012: Contemporary Voices, African Art Centre, Durban.
2011: Izikhwepha Zethu, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: Don’t Panic, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2010: Group Exhibition, BAT Centre, Durban.

Group Exhibitions (International)


2018: 7th International Biennial pastel exhibition, Nowy Sącz, Poland.

Amasosha collective exhibitions


2016: Messages from the Soul, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2016: Creative pot, Umlazi community hall, Durban.
2016: Hope in the struggle, Amini Florida, Durban.
2015: Siyaya, Greedy Buddha, Umhlanga.
2015: Eye Candy, Hilton Art Festival, Durban.
2015: Umhlabelo, Atelier Shop 2, Durban; BAT Centre, Durban.

Public Art Projects


2010: Mosaic at Sakhithemba Centre, KwaZulu-Natal.
2011: Mural of Inqola noseyili at photography exhibition by Zoro Xaba, Durban.
2011: Renewal of BAT Centre Mural, Durban.
2011: Waterfall Mural, Victoria Market bridge (for Don’t panic exhibition), Durban.
2012: Mural in Concordia-Tunnel, Bremen, Germany.

Collections


Nandos Art Collection, Southern Africa.
Amazwi Contemporary Art, Michigan.
Leiterin der stadtischen Galerie, Bremen.
Durban Art Gallery collection, Durban.
Bertha Foundation collection, International.
Deborra Patta private collection, South Africa.
Kevin Mabanga private collection, South Africa.

Awards


2015: Most promising artist, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.

Other


2012: Facilitator at Wushwini Art and Culture Heritage, Art in school Project, Durban.

 

Patricia de Villiers

b. 1950, Cape Town, South Africa; lives in Cape Town.
Patricia de Villiers is an artist, illustrator and designer. She has been active as a cultural worker and poster designer since the early 1970s, contributing to community organisations including the Community Arts Project in the 1980s in Cape Town, and the Broadside Workers’ Theatre Company in the UK. 

Bio

Born nearly in 1950 in Cape Town, to an Afrikaans father and an English mother.

Schooled in numerous places and received an education (of a sort) in fine art at what was then the Johannesburg College of Art, primarily dedicated to the production of ‘commercial artists’, teachers and, above all, industrial designers.

Fled the miseries and artificialities of apartheid in the early 1970’s to study and then practice stage design in London. Drawn by Marxism and Feminism I joined a touring theatre company that made plays ‘with and about’ the trade union movement and drew its inspirational roots from Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weil as well as the folk tradition of the broadside ballad.

Post 1976, I resolved to return to South Africa, and decided that my most practical contribution to the anti-apartheid struggle was to become a printer. I then learnt the trade (with limited success) at a Cooperative Press where I learned in particular to throw large reams of paper up the stairs. I was also schooled in the politics of the ANC but was finally (I thought shamingly) advised that I was ‘probably most suited to cultural work’.

I returned to Cape Town in the early eighties and soon discovered that the local printing trade did not accommodate white female offset litho machine operators. However, after a period back in theatre with the People’s Space, I was introduced to the Community Arts Project at a serendipitous moment  - just after the Gaborone Arts Festival when the assembled artists poets and performers were buzzing with excitement and resolve.

Joined and remained for 10 years with the Silkscreen Workshop aka Poster Workshop aka Media Project. After a quiet beginning, with the launch of the UDF and thereafter until the end of the decade, the workshop became a production line for hand-printed posters, banners and T-shirts, enthusiastically, if somewhat wildly, produced by youth groups, civics and community organisations of various affiliations. Our efforts to move with the times and become a training centre rather than a ‘service organisation’ never quite took off – the prescience of IBM in showering computers across the liberation movement meant that our methodologies and love of the silkscreen took on a quaint and nostalgic aspect.

After the birth of my daughter (in the nick of time, given my age) I turned to illustration, poster making and cartoon strips for both adults and children. This enjoyable, poorly paid, and, at times, lonely and apparently irrelevant, occupation was followed by an opportunity to work in the newly designed provincial health department. Here I spent 15 years striving to fit my rough round peg into the infinitely square, finely chiseled and intellectually challenging hole that is the health sector.

These days I am busy oiling my rusty artistic cogs with a view to doing, full-time, what I think I do best and certainly love the most – drawing, painting and making things with my hands.

Education


1990: Advanced Diploma in Adult Education (with distinction), Centre for Adult & Continuing Education (CASE), University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
1981: Certificate in Reprographics (day-release), London College of Printing, London.
1973: Certificate in Theatre & Costume Design, Sadler’s Wells Design School, London.
1972: National Diploma in Fine Arts (with distinction), Johannesburg School of Art, Johannesburg.

Career


1997 - 2012: Deputy Director of Health Promotion, Western Cape Health Department, Cape Town.
1989 - 1997: Volunteer, Community Arts Project (CAP), (made various posters, illustrations to support the ANC electoral campaign), Cape Town.
1982 - 1989: Founder member and Project Coordinator of 'CAP Poster Workshop'/ 'CAP Media Project', Community Arts Project (CAP), Cape Town.
1981 - 1983: Stage Management & Costume Design, People’s Space Theatre, Cape Town.
1971 – 1981: Resident Designer, Co-writer/ Producer, Broadside Workers’ Theatre Company, London.
1970s - Lithographic Printer, Spiderweb Print Cooperative, London.
1970s - Freelance stage and costume designer, London, Birmingham, Bristol.

Published Works


1989 - 1997: Cartoon booklets and other materials for adults, Careers Research and Information Centre, Grassroots Educare, Early Learning Resource Unit, Catholic Welfare and Development, Cape Town; Juta Publishers, Maskew Miller Longman, Johannesburg; Constitutional Assembly, South Africa.
1989 - 1997: Thirteen fully-illustrated children’s books and numerous contributing illustrations and posters, Juta Publishers, Maskew Miller Longman, Heinemann Publishers, Kagiso Education Publishers, Johannesburg; Oxford University Press, Cape Town.

Celestino Mudaulane

b. 1972, Maputo Mozambique.

Mudaulane (Mondlane) produces innovative, often monumental ceramic sculptures as well as large, striking drawings. His works are highly imaginative, visualizing a world that mediates the material and the spiritual, the playful and the confrontational.

(Please note that this page is under construction)

Education


1997 Faculty of Fine Arts, Porto (workshop or internship)
1997 University of KwaZulu Natal (workshop or internship)
1994 Art Foundation, South Africa (workshop or internship)
1992 Completed ceramic course, National School of Visual Arts (ENAV), Maputo

Positions held


Founder member, Muvart
Member, Nucleo de Arte, Maputo
Lecturer in ceramics, design and drawing, National School of Visual Arts (ENAV), Maputo

Solo Exhibitions


1997 Núcleo de Arte, Maputo

Group Exhibitions (Mozambique)


2010 Ocupações Temporárias, Maputo
2006 Expo Arte Contemporanea, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
2003 Quero conhecer-te África, Fortaleza de Maputo
2003 Bienal da TDM, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
2003 Exposição Colectiva de Artes Plásticas, Instituto Camões, Maputo
2002 Exposição de Pintura, Desenho, Escultura e Cerâmica, Fundação Alberto Chissano, Maputo
2001 Bienal TDM, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
2001 Contra a Violência Infantil, Centro Cultural Franco-Moçambicano, Maputo
2000 Plasticidades em Moçambique, Instituto Camões, Maputo
1999 Expo Annual Musart, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
1993 2º Workshop, Escola Nacional de Artes Visuais, Maputo

Group Exhibitions (International)


2014 Celestino Mudaulane, Goncalo Mabunda, Mauro Pinto, Galeria 111, Lisbon, Portugal
2011 Idioma Comum, Fundação PLMJ, Lisbon, Portugal
2008 Arte Lisboa 08 - Feira de Arte Contemporânea, FIL, Lisbon, Portugal
2007 Muvart Nouva Africa, Antico Palazzo della Pretura di Castell ‘Arquato, Milan, Italy
2006 Arco’06 - Feira de Arte Contemporânea, Madrid, Spain
2006-08 Replica e Rebelda, travelling exhibition organized by the Camoes Institute
2004 Arte Lisboa 04, Lisbon, Portugal
1997 Exposição de Pintura e Cerâmica, Escola Secundária de Soares dos Reis, Porto, Portugal

Awards


2003 1º Prémio de Cerâmica, Bienal da TDM, Maputo
2003 Prémio de Consagração, Fundação Alberto Chissano, Maputo
1999 1º Prémio de Cerâmica, Expo Annual Musart, Maputo

Publications


2007 Muvart Nouva Africa, Antico Palazzo della Pretura di Castell ‘Arquato, Milan (catalogue/ brochure), Pedro Campos Costa (curator)
2006 Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo Expo Arte Contemporanea (catalogue, international exhibition
2001 Bienal TDM (catalogue). Edited by Andre Salamao Mabjala and Ciro Pereira
1999 Expo Annual Musart. Museu Nacional de Arte.

Faith47

b. 1979, Cape Town. Lives in Los Angeles, USA. Faith XLVII (previously Faith47) is a street and studio-based artist who works with a wide range of media.  Her approach is explorative and substrate appropriate – from found and rescued objects, to time-layered and history-textured city walls and their accretions, to studio prepared canvas and wood. Her murals can be found in many cities in Europe, the USA, Africa and Asia.

Solo Exhibitions


2018: Elixir, Fabien Castanier Gallery, Miami.
2015: AQUA REGALIA, Jonathan Levine Gallery, New York. 
2014: Aqua Regalia, London, UK
2013: Fragments of a burnt history, David Krut Gallery, Johannesburg.
2009: Epitaph, Mrego, Brussels. 
2008: The Restless Debt Of Third World Beauty, Atm Gallery, Berlin.
2008: The Restless Debt Of Third World Beauty, The Woom Gallery, Birmingham, UK

Group Exhibitions - International


2020: One World, Fabien Castanier Gallery, Miami. 
2020: Unprecedented Times, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Vienna.
2019: 20 Year Anniversary Exhibition, Cory Helford Gallery, Los Angeles.
2019: Together, KP Projects Gallery, Los Angeles.
2019: Conquête Urbaine, Calais Museum of Fine Art, Paris. 
2019: Veni, Vidi, Vinci, Fluctuart, Paris.
2019: Tàpia, B-Murals, Barcelona. 
2019: Capture the Street, River Tales, Germany.
2019: We Rise, Los Angeles, USA.
2019: Beyond the Streets, New York City.
2019: Women in Street Art, Bernard Magrez Foundation, France.
2019: Art Miami, Miami.
2019: Art Basel, Miami. 
2018: One Way Through, Heron Gallery, San Francisco. 
2018: Women in Street Art, The Bernard Magrez Foundation, Paris. 
2018: True Will, Chins Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand.
2018: Moniker Art Fair, New York and London.
2018: Art Miami, Fabien Casteneir Gallery, Miami.
2018: Art Basel Miami, Miami.
2017: Urban Currents, Gallerie Kirk, Denmark.
2017: Magic Cities, Munich, Germany.
2017: the UrbanArt Biennale® , UNESCO Voelklinger Huette World heritage site,  Germany.
2017: Homeless, Void Projects, Miami.
2016: XX: A moment in time, Saatchi Gallery, London.
2016: Freedom as Form, Wunderkameren Gallery, Milan. 
2016: PM10, Urban Nation Museum, Berlin. 
2016: Agitprop, Brooklyn Museum, New York. 
2014: Artscape , Malmoe, Sweden.
2014: Forest for the trees mural festival, Portland.
2014: Rencontres Australes d’Imaitsoanala, Antananaraivo, Madagascar.
2014: A study of Hair, Backwoods Galley, Melbourne.
2014: Redux , Inoperable Gallery, Vienna.
2014: Outdoor Urban art festival, Rome, Italy.
2014: Wywood walls, Art Basel, Miami.
2013: Anniversary Group Show ,White Walls Gallery, San Fransisco.
2013: Memorie Urbane Contemporary Festival, Gaeta, Italy.
2013: Escape the Golden Cage , Vienna, Austria.
2013: XII. Into the Dark, Unit44, The Victoria Tunnel, Newcastle.
2013: Scupltura Viva International Symposium, San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.
2013: DOS, Toronto.
2013: Women on the walls, Jeffrey Deitch and Wynwood Walls, Miami. 
2013: Beyond Eden, Thinkspace Gallery, Los Angeles.
2013: Wall Therapy, New York. 
2013: Wooster Collective 10 Year Anniversary Show, Jonathan Levine Gallery, New York. 
2013: Nuart Festival, Stavanger, Norway.
2013: Avant-Garde Urbano Festival, Tudela de Navarra, Spain.
2013: Los Muros Hablan, San Juan, Puerto Rico. 
2012: Antenna Garden, Rtist Gallery, Melbourne.
2012: Carbon Event, Melbourne.
2012: Warrington Museum, London.
2012: Herzensbrecher, Strychnin Gallery, Berlin.
2012: Kulturhuset , Stockholm.
2012: Wynood Walls, Miami.
2011: Urban Painting, Milan.
2011: MSA Gallery, Paris.
2011: Urban Mural Project, Greece. 
2011: Gossip Well Told, Second Edition, Warrington Museum, London.
2011: City Leaks Festival, Cologne.
2011: Inner Walls, Milan.
2011: Les murs litinerrance, Paris.
2011: Gossip Well Told, Blackall Studio, London.
2011: Visual Intervention, Rochester.
2011: Archetypes, View Art Gallery, England.
2011: Artmosh, Munich.
2011: Wuppertal Museum, Germany. 
2010: Moniker Art Fair, London.
2010: Stroke03 Art Fair, Berlin.
2010: Escape 2010, Veinna.
2010: Biennial, Sao Paulo.
2010: Urbanus International Mural Project, China.
2010: Focus10, Switzerland.
2010: Le Salon Du Cercle De La Culture A Berlin, Circle Culture Gallery, Berlin.
2010: Design For Humanity, Thinkspace, Los Angeles.
2010: or Those Who Live In It…, Mu Gallery, Eindhoven.
2010: Muao Project, A Coruna, Spain. 
2010: Paint Your Faith, Aayden Gallery, Vancouver.
2010: A Cry For Help, Thinkspace, Los Angeles. 
2009: The Generations, The Showroom Gallery, New York.
2009: Artmosh, Paris.
2009: Artotale International Mural Project, Lueneberg, Germany.
2009: No New Enemies , Mr Ego, Brussels. 
2009: Four, 34 Long Fine Art Gallery , Cape Town.
2008: 1st Internationale Graffiti Bienale, belo Horizonte, Brazil. 
2008: Anything Could Happen, Carmichael Gallery, Los Angeles. 
2008: Fatally Yours, Crewest Gallery, Los Angeles.
2007: Crossover, Showroom Gallery, New York.
2007: Be Girl Be, Jntermedia Arts, Minneapolis.
2007: Pick Of The Harvest: Batch Four, Thinkspace Gallery, Los Angeles.
2005: Subglob, Orebro, Sweden
2005: Go Gallery, Amsterdam

Group Exhibitions - South Africa


2020: Staring Straight to the Future, Everard Read Gallery, Cape Town.
2020: PINK, Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg. 
2020: Investec Cape Town Art Fair, Cape Town. 
2019: On Main Road, Constitution Hill Women’s Jail, Johannesburg, South Africa 
2019: FNB Art Joburg, Johannesburg.
2018: Investec Cape Town Art Fair, Cape Town. 
2017: Dislocation, Everard Read Gallery, Cape Town.
2017: Invisible Exhibition, The Centre for the Less Good Idea, Johannesburg.
2017: Investec Cape Town Art Fair, Cape Town.
2011: Outside, 34 Long Gallery, Cape Town.
2010: Cool Stuff, 34 Fine Art Gallery, Cape Town. 
2010: Nothing Is Everything, Word Of Art Gallery, Cape Town.
2009: Group Soup, Word Of Art Gallery, Cape Town.
2007: The Art Of The Living Dead, Baseline Studios, Johannesburg. 
2006: New Suburbia, Pretoria.
2006: Lines Of Attitude, South Africa and Kenya. 

Murals - International

2020: Y/our Vote, USA. 
2019: Universal Studios Indoor Artwork Commission, Los Angeles. 
2019: Dictator Art Installation, Columbia.
2019: United Labor Organization 100 Year Mural, New York City.
2019: Maya Angelou School Mural Upliftment Project, Los Angeles. 
2019: Mural Arts Large Mural Production, Philadelphia.
2019: Projection Mapping Mural, BLINK, Cincinnati. 
2019: RED, Mural Project for HIV Awareness, Lyon.
2018: Summit LA18, Los Angeles. 
2017: Artscape Festival, Sweden.
2017: Art Republic Mural Project, Jacksonville. 
2017: Art Council Public art intervention, New Orleans.
2017: Art Miami, Juxtapoz Clubhouse installation, Miami. 
2016: Cities of Hope Mural Project, Manchester. 
2016: Inter|urban Mural Project, Cleaveland. 
2016: Wynwood Walls, Art Basel, Miami.
2015: The Psychic Power of Animals Street Intervention, New York. 
2015: Dragon Tiger Mountain Mural Project, Nanachang, China.
2015: Pow Wow Taiwan, Taipei. 
2015: Ono’u Mural Project, Tahiti.
2015: Festival Mural, Montreal, Canada.
2015: Murals for Oceans Expedition Mural Project, Cozumel, Mexico.
2014: 5 Sector Mural Project, Glasgow.
2014: Berlin Wall 25th Anniversary Group Show, Paris.
2014: Djerbahood, Djerba, Tunisia.
2013: Pow Wow Mural Project, Hawaii.
2013: Upfest Mural Project, Bristol.
2013: MAUS Mural Project, Malaga, Spain.
2012: Mural Project, Tel Aviv.
2012: Aarhus International Mural Project, Aarhus, Denmark.
2012: Mural Project, Sion, Switzerland.
2012: Mural Project, Melun, France.
2012: Paris Free Walls, Paris.
2012: Wall Therapy, Mural Project, New York.
2012: World Open Walls, Miami.

Murals - South Africa

2017: Johannesburg Mural, Sandton. 
2016: 1200 - 900 BC, Cape Town, South Africa. 
2016: Unearth, Napier, South Africa. 
2015: Landfill Meditation Street Intervention, Johannesburg.
2015: Feet Don't Fail Me Now, Johannesburg. 
2014: A Study of Warwick Triangle at Rush Hour, Durban.
2015: Una Salus Victus Nullam Sperare Salutem, Johannesburg, 2015.
2014: Harvest, Cape Town. 
2012: The Long Wait, Johannesburg.

Selected Publications & Links

Dave Mann, "CHANT: Faith XLVII’s public practice", Daily Maverick, April 22, 2020.

Ilana Herzig, "The Renegades Making Feminist Art In the Streets", Hyperallergic, October 31, 2019.

Petra Mason, "15 Young local artists that have wowed the world in 2019/", Times Lives, December 15, 2019.

Charu Suri, "Five Women Reinventing the Face of Street Art", Muse, August 8, 2018.

Liz Ohanesian, "This South African Street Artist Moved to L.A. to Explore the Politics of Being Human", LA Mag, April 17, 2018.

Brent Lindeque, "South African graffiti piece tops the worlds best list!', Good Things Guy, January 11, 2018.

Petra Mason, "Re-Mixing History: African Women Artists at Art Basel Miami Beach 2017", Whitehot Magazine, December 2017.

Elizabeth Mccray, “Faith47”, Bliss magazine, April 2014

Ashraf Jamal, “Graffiti art: Faith 47,” Financial mail, April 23, 2014.

Brendon Bell-Roberts; Ashraf Jamal, “100 Good Ideas,” March, 2014.

Lisa van Wyk, “Faith47: Street Artist,” Mail & Guardian. 

Daisy Wyatt, “In search of a female Banksy: Aiko and Faith47 take on a male-dominated street art world,” The Independent, October 15, 2013.

Charlie Finch, “The Savage Street,” Artnet. 

Bsrat Mezghebe, “Faith47, Street Art and South Africa’s Contradictions,” CIMAMAG, October, 2013.

Dal + Faith,” Very Nearly Almost Magazine, March, 2013.

Foadmin, “Faith47: Sea to Sea,” Fair Observer, December 26, 2012.

Andy Davis, “We Close Our Eyes to Stay Blind,” November 21, 2012.

“Interview with Faith47,” Dumbwall.

Matthew Krouse, “Streets ahead in the realm of public art,” Mail & Guardian, October 26, 2012.

“Faith47 (ZA),” Art Bastard.

“Walls & Frames: Fine Art from the Streets,” September, 2011.

Nicholas Ganz, “Graffiti World," 2009.

Kiriakos Iosifidis, “Mural Art,” November, 2008.

Nicholas Ganz, “Graffiti Woman,” 2006.

 

Lionel Davis

b. 1936, District Six, Cape Town. Lives in Muizenberg, Cape Town.

A former political prisoner, Lionel Davis’ name features prominently in the history of the Community Arts Project, Vakalisa Art Associates, Thupelo Workshop and Greatmore Artists Studios. Drawing, painting, and printing, and often combining these media, Davis works in visual modes that range from the realist to the abstract. His themes include everyday scenes as well as reflections on black and African identity.

This was initially published online in 2003 (on the Africa Centre’s Contemporary Africa Database, now defunct). It appears here in its original form.
Lionel Davis profile (published at www.africaexpert.org.uk)

Political activist and prisoner turned artist and educator, Lionel Davis cuts a distinct figure in the South African arts and culture landscape. A living archive, he has lived a significant part of his life in or on two of apartheids most notorious symbols, District Six and Robben Island. He has also been closely involved with two key arts organisations, the Community Arts Project (CAP) and the Thupelo Workshop.

It was at an early age growing up in District Six that Davis “became aware of the brutality of police, especially white police, in their attitude to and treatment of people of colour”. Davis says that “this became more of an issue for me, and I always used to stand up for people who were being pushed around. This got me into trouble, and into fights… I was caned once by the police for allegedly hitting a white woman in Woodstock, when I was trying to defend a colleague…”. Aware of the need to educate himself Davis attended night school (on the site where Harold Cressy School now stands), where then in his mid-twenties, he met members of the Non European Unity Movement (NEUM) and began attending political meetings. Davis joined APDUSA (African Peoples Democratic Union of South Africa), an off-shoot of the NEUM, but grew disenchanted with them, describing APDUSA as a “theory shop”. He was part of the core group led by Neville Alexander that broke away from APDUSA to form the Mao Tse Tung inspired National Liberation Front, whose goal was to use arms to overthrow the state. In 1964 he was among a group of eleven that was sentenced to gaol for ‘Conspiring to Commit Sabotage’.

During his seven year sentence Davis completed his schooling by correspondence. Released in 1971 and placed under house arrest he worked as a labourer and then a clerk on building sites, until one day in 1978 he chanced upon CAP, then in infant form. At CAP Davis would go on to play multiple roles for over two decades. From his initial role as cleaner/ handyman/ assistant administrator and student, Davis went on to be a long serving art educator/trainer/ facilitator, specialising in drawing, screen-printing and mural painting, teaching children, youth and adults. He also played a leadership role in CAP: he was elected chairperson in 1988, playing the role of co-ordinator (or acting director); and in the nineties he served two years as a Trustee.

Prior to CAP, Davis’ had no previous art tuition. His art experience was limited to his childhood, drawing cartoon heroes with found materials on the streets and walls of District Six. At CAP he proved to be a diligent student, quickly mastering drawing, the medium that has remained the back-bone to his artistic practice. He was introduced to lino-cut printing by resident artist Mpathi Gocini, who came to CAP via the Evangelical Arts & Crafts Centre in Natal, better known by its location at Rorkes Drift. In 1980 Davis went to Rorkes Drift where he spent two years, returning to Cape Town with a diploma in Fine Arts. It was at Rorkes Drift that Davis learned new graphic techniques and began to appreciate the potential of screen-printing as a medium. His stay there was also important for his artistic development because it brought him into contact with other black artists nationally, paving the way for his later involvement with the Thupelo Workshop.

In 1982 Davis assisted in organising the Cape Town contingent to attend the Culture & Resistance Symposium in Gaborone, organised by the African National Congress (ANC). This is widely regarded as a seminal event which was responsible for recognising the role of artists in cultural resistance, and for shifting the notion of ‘artist’ to that of ‘cultural worker’. A direct outcome of this event was the establishment of a Poster Workshop at CAP. It was here, and its later incarnation as the CAP Media Project that Davis was active for most of the 80s as a screenprint facilitator. Initially most of this work involved producing posters, t-shirts, and banners, much of it political in content. Much of this was done on behalf of political and community organisations, and was frequently banned or confiscated by authorities; whereas his later work for the Media Project entailed training members of community and political organisations to produce their own media.

Davis also played a political role at CAP, especially in countering what he perceived as the hegemonic tendencies of political organisations.Following the launch in 1983 of the United Democratic Front (the internally based resistance movement that was politically aligned to the ANC), there was pressure on CAP to affiliate to the UDF. Similar pressures resurfaced in the late eighties. Davis says of CAP that “[although it] wished to play a political role in the struggle it did not see itself as being party political and made its facilities available to all progressive political tendencies.” He is proud of the role he played in communicating CAP’s non-aligned position to a range of political organisations, especially trade unions and community groupings who may have been alienated, or possibly denied access, by a politically aligned CAP.

In 1987 Davis attended the International Triangle Workshop in New York, an initiative that had given rise to the Thupelo Project a few years earlier. Davis was a Thupelo stalwart, serving as a Trustee for eleven years, and attending no less than nine national workshops between 1986 and 2001. He also attended triangle affiliated workshops in Botswana and Zimbabwe. Thupelo was initially best known for encouraging exploration of materials, and initially this resulted in a mass of abstract paintings. That many black artists abandoned (at least temporarily) more realist modes of working in favour of a painting style and approach that some radical critiques saw as an expression of American cultural imerialism, meant that Thupelo received a mixed reception on the left, whilst being welcomed by establishment voices such as the SA National Gallery’s Marilyn Martin. For many of the artists who were invited to these workshops, Thupelo was undeniably a liberating experience. For Davis, Thupelo was an important part of his exploration of painting, a media to which he had previously had limited access, and he derided his critics claiming that he had never had the opportunities to ‘play’ with art materials, something that was taken for granted as part of (mostly white) privileged children’s development. He also benefitted from Thupelo’s emphasis on scale, and some of his works from Thupelo, such as African Sunset, are among his best known.

Davis also worked as an art educator for the SA National Gallery (SANG), where he was responsible for teaching primary school teachers from the townships to teach art to children. This built on his experience teaching children (in the early eighties) and as media trainer at CAP, as well as the training he undertook (in the nineties) for a diploma from the Curriculum Development Project in teaching teachers to teach art in schools. He also served as a Trustee of the SANG as part of its first ‘democratically constituted’ Board. While the national galleries of Zimbabwe (who have used Davis three times an international ajudicator) and Botswana have bought works from Davis for their collection, the SANG has yet to acquire one of his works.

Davis’ current employer, the Robben Island Museum, has provided him with the unique opportunity to live on the site where he was once imprisoned. Initially employed as a tour guide along with other former political prisoners, Davis is now employed by the Museum as Heritage Educator and does much of his work with secondary school pupils. He plans to retire in three years, when at the ripe age of seventy we can expect his art to bloom like never before. Indeed Davis’ road to becoming an artist has been a much longer one than most other artists. He was 42 when he started classes at CAP and 58 when he graduated as a Fine Artist at UCT. His work has been exhibited in numerous group shows at home and abroad (USA, England, Germany, Greece), but he has never had a solo show. A Lionel Davis retrospective is clearly overdue.

Mario Pissarra

Kunst for alle. by Toril Kojan, 2005.

 

  Life can be different – Learning Cape Festival, 2004.

 

First Mobil Zimbabwe Heritage Biennale, 1998.

 

  Zimbabwe Heritage, 1997.

 

Zimbabwe Heritage, 1996.

 

  Akal – The Congress of South African Writers – August 88 Vol 1, 1988.

 

Ascent arts student’s publication, February 1984.

 

Songs of a New Dawn – Hymn book

 

Ten Years at Greatmore Studios Cape Town

 

  25 Years of Caversham Press – Artists, Prints , Community. 2011.

 

Reflections from Thupelo International Workshop, 2007.

 

  Botaki 3 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2007.

 

Botaki 2 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2005.

 

  Upfront and Personal – Three Decades of Political Graphics, 2003.

 

Cross Currents – Contemporary art practice in South Africa, an exhibition in two parts, 2000.

 

  Thirty minutes – Installation by nine artists, 1997.

 

Thapong international artist’s workshop Kenya, 1989.

 

  The Neglected Tradition – Towards a New History of South African art, 1988.

 

Thupelo art workshop, 1986.

 

  Art From South Africa, 1990.

 


Making Art in Africa 1960-2010, ed. by Polly Savage. Published by Lund Humphries, December 2014.

 

  Uncontained – Opening the Community Arts Project archive, ed. by Heidi Grunebaum & Emile Maurice. Published by the Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, 2012.

 

Triangle: Variety of Experience around Artists’ Workshops and Residencies. Published by Triangle Arts Trust, 2007.

 

  Visual culture and public memory in a democratic South Africa, Annie Coombes. Published by Duke University Press Books, 2003.

 

Shuld…immer nur die anderen. Published by Flensburger Hefte, 2004.

 

  Turning to one another – Simple conversations to restore hope to the future, Margaret Wheatley. Published by Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2002.

 

Printmaking in a transforming South Africa, Philipa Hobbs & Elizabeth Rankin. Published by David Krut Bookstores, 1997.

 

  Islamic Art and Culture in Sub Saharan Africa, Karin Adahl & Berit Sahlstrom.Published by Uppsala University, 1995.

 

Art From South African Townships, Gavin Younge. Published by Thames and Hudson, 1988.

 

Echoes of African Art, compiled by Matsemela Manaka. Published by Skotaville Publishers, 1987.

 

Jabula Journal – Rorkes Drift student journal. Published by Rorkes Drift Fine Art School, 1981.

 

  Until freedom Dawns – Poetry anthology, Frank Meintjies

 

(School Project) – The Significance of CAP in the lives of Sydney Holo and Lionel Davis, Hannah Schultz

 


 

awakeningspublicationEdited by Mario Pissarra
Texts by Ayesha Price, Barbara Voss, Bridget Thompson, Deirdre Prins-Solani, Elizabeth Rankin & Philippa Hobbs, Ernestine White, Jacqueline Nolte, Lionel Davis, Patricia de Villiers, Thembinkosi Goniwe and Tina Smith, with introduction by Mario Pissarra, forewords by Bonita Bennett and Premesh Lalu, and preface by Nomusa Makhubu.
Design by Carlos Marzia
Date: 2017
ISBN 978-0-620-77209-9

Click here for more information.

 

 

Art Education

1995: Diploma from the Curriculum Development Project in teaching teachers to teach art in primary schools, Johannesburg, South Africa.
1994: B.A. Fine Arts degree, University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa.
1981: Diploma in Fine Arts Evangelical Lutheran Art and Craft Centre at Rorkes Drift, Kwazulu-Natal.
1978:Community Arts Project (CAP), Cape Town.

Workshops & residencies

2005: Caversham Press, KZN, South Africa.
2013: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2010: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2008: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2005: Thupelo, AMAC, Cape Town.
2004: Thupelo, Masibambisani School, Cape Town.
2001: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1997: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1995: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1993: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1992: Pachinpamwe Workshop, Zimbabwe.
1991: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1990: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1989: Thapong International Artists workshop, Botswana.
1988: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1987: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1987: Triangle International Artists workshop,Pine Plains, New York, USA.
1986: Thupelo, Cape Town.

Selected Solo Exhibitions

2009: Maskerade, Association of Visual Arts, Cape Town.
2007: Gill Aldermann Galery, Kenilworth, Cape Town.

Selected Group Exhibitions

2018: Feedback: Art, Africa and the 1980s, Iwalewahaus, Bayreuth, Germany
2015: A Labour of Love, Weltkulturen Museum, Frankfurt.
2007: Conversation In Four Parts (with Barbara Voss, Ruth Carneson and Paul Stopforth), Nelson Mandela Gateway, Cape Town.
2004: A Decade of Democracy: South African Art 1994 2004, National Gallery, Cape Town.
1998: Kaapse Lading, Athens, Greece.
1997: Kaapse Lading, Klein Karoo National Arts Festival, Oudtshoorn.
1995: National Gallery, Cape Town.
1994: [Joint SA exhibition], Museum of Modern Art, London, UK.
1994: National Gallery, Cape Town.
1992: Pachipamwe international artists exhibition, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Bulawayo.
1992: Pachipamwe international artists exhibition, The National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare.
1992: South African Black and White 45 years on, Cape Town [organised by British Council].
1988: Neglected Tradition, Johannesburg Art Gallery.
1987: Triangle International Artist exhibition, Pine Plains, Upstate New York, USA.
1987: Johannesburg Art Foundation.
1987: NSA, Durban.
1987: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1986: Kuns Aus Sud Afrika, series of exhibitions in Germany (including Weltkulturen Museum).
1986: Art in our Time, Cape Town.
1986: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.
1984: Second Carnegie Enquiry into Poverty' in SA.
1982: The Culture and Resistance Festival, Gaborone, Botswana.
1982: Art Toward Social Development An Exhibition of SA Art, National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1981: African Arts Festival, University of Zululand.

Collections


Public collections in South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe.

Public Speaking

2014: Guest speaker at Impressions of Rorke’s Drift, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2014: Guest speaker at Talking Heads, Africa Centre, Cape Town.
2010: Guest speaker with Ahmed Kathrada and Christo Brandt, Freedom Park, Pretoria.
2005: Guest speaker, invited to speak on issues of human rights and colour prejudice, Ontario, Canada.
2002-2003: Guest speaker, invited to speak in multiple platforms such as schools, colleges and national television, Oslo, Norway.
2005: Panelist on human rights conference, University of Connecticut, USA.
1999: Guest speaker at the annual Humor Conference, Saratoga Springs, New York, USA.

Jarrett Erasmus

b. 1984, Cape Town. Lives in Johannesburg.

Erasmus works in various media, focusing on current collaboration while thinking about post apartheid realities and its affects on the social dynamics between communities in South Africa as well as the diaspora.


Education


2017  Masters in Fine Art, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016  ZHdk Summer School programme, Zurich, Switzerland
2007 - 2010  Bachelor of Fine Arts, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
2005 - 2006  Design and Visual art Certificate, Arts and Media Access Centre (AMAC), Cape Town, South Africa
2003 – 2005  Cape Peninsula University of Technology Graphic Design

Projects and Exhibitions

2019  The Main Complaint, group exhibition, Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town, South Africa
2018  Curatorial Care, Humanising Practices conference, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South
Africa
2018  Museum Dialogues conference, Goethe Institut, Windhoek, Namibia
2018  Kewpie, The Daughter of District Six, public art event in collaboration with Gay And Lesbian Memory in Action and District Six Museum, Cape Town, South Africa
2017  Panelist, Any Given Sunday presentation, African Art in Venice Forum, Italy
2016  Re(as)sisting Narratives, group exhibition, District Six Museum, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2016  Foundations and Futures, group exhibition, Bag Factory Arts studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016  Festival D’Art Urbain, Antanarivo, Madagascar
2016  Straatpraatjies, Burning Museum performance, Cape Town, South Africa
2016  Poetry Circle Nowhere workshop, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2015  Empty Ghosts, Public Art project, Johannesburg, South Africa
2015  Artificial Facts: Boundary Objects, group exhibition, Kunsthaus Dresden, Germany (Burning Museum)
2015  Objetos Frontera, CA2M, Madrid, Spain (Burning Museum)
2015  Addressing the Headquarters, presentation, Framer Framed, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Burning Museum)
2015  Cover Version, Gallery MoMo, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2015  Fortunes Remixed, group exhibition. Bag Factory Artist’s Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014  Manufractured, Burning Museum performance, Cape Town, South Africa
2014  Ubuntu Artist Exchange, Studio Museum in Harlem, NY
2014  Plakkers, group exhibition, Brundyn Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2014  Do It, Michaelis Gallery, UCT, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2013  TO LET , Centre For African Studies gallery, UCT, Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Co-Curator, Till it Breaks, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Currency and Curiosity, Joule City Incubator & Research Studio, Cape Town, South Africa
2012  Material Things, solo exhibition, Nafasi Art Space, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2012  S A S, group exhibition, Bag Factory, Johannesburg, South Africa
2011  Mural Painting project at Community House, Salt River
2010  Plures Tectonicus (Many Mansions), Graduate solo exhibition, Albany Natural Sciences Museum Shell Gallery, Grahamstown, South Africa
2006  Mural painting, Artscape Theatre, Cape Town, South Africa

Workshops and Residencies

2018  OpenLab: The Art of Making, artists residency, Richmond, South Africa
2014  Thupelo Artist’s Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa
2014  Arts Aweh Ambassadors programme (facilitator), Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Resident artist, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town, South Africa
2012 Cyan Development Concepts creative development workshops (teacher), Cape Town, South Africa
2012  Visiting Artist Residency, Through the lens: Drawing workshop, NAFASI Art Space, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2012  Visiting Artist Residency, Bag Factory Artist’s Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2012  Artist's workshop, Thupelo, Cape Town, South Africa
2011  Participant and facilitator, Koekenaap artists workshop, Matzikama District, South Africa

 

Awards and Academic achievements


2013  Business and Arts administrative certificate
2012  David Koloane Award
2011  Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (Painting), Masters Degree Scholarship

Experience


2017 - present  Sessional Lecturer, Visual Arts, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014  Infecting the City Festival High Schools programme, South Africa
2013 – 2014  Researcher and Digital archivist, Africa South Art Initiative (ASAI), Cape Town, South Africa
2010 – 2012  Facilitator, Cyan Development Concepts community arts and creative development workshops, Cape Town, South Africa
2009 – 2010 Intern, Artb Gallery, Bellville, South Africa

Assistant (N.R.F. internship), Visual Art undergraduate programme, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
Production Assistant, VOLTA Art Fair, Art Basel, Switzerland
Board member, Thupelo Artists Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa

Mzuzile Mduduzi Xakaza

b. 1965, Maphumulo, KwaZulu-Natal; lives in Durban.
Mzuzile Mduduzi Xakaza’s landscapes draw on personal and collective histories of KwaZulu-Natal. The images respond critically to a tradition of colonial landscape painting that is underwritten by connotations of settler ownership and white authority, and thus Black dispossession. Rather than acting as a detached observer of the land, Xakaza portrays it from a position of belonging.

 

Education


2015: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), History, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2004: Post-Graduate Diploma, Museum and Heritage Studies, Universities of Cape Town, University of the Western Cape and Robben Island Museum, Cape Town.
2002: M.A. Fine Art, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg.
1996: B.A. (Hons) History of Art, University of South Africa, Pretoria.
1992: B.A. Fine Art, University of Fort Hare, Alice.
1992: Higher Diploma in Education, University of Fort Hare, Alice.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2010: New Landscape paintings and drawings, African Art Centre, Durban.
2007: New Landscape paintings, African Art Centre, Durban.
2005: New Landscape paintings, The NSA Gallery, Durban.
2003: Landscape paintings, African Art Centre, Durban.
2001: Landscape paintings, drawings and graphic prints (MAFA portfolio), Tatham Art Gallery,
Pietermaritzburg.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2012: View, KwaZulu-Natal Society of Artists (KZNSA) Gallery, Durban.
2012: Barbara Lindop at Home, Barbara Lindop's residence, Johannesburg.
2011: Barbara Lindop at Home, Barbara Lindop's residence, Johannesburg.
2011: Three Parts/ More Harmony, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: Who Am I….Ngingubani?, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2010: What We See: Reconsidering an Anthropometrical Collection from Southern Africa, Iziko Slave Lodge, Cape Town.
2010: The Lie of the Land, Old Town House, Cape Town.
2010: People, Prints and Process: 25 Years at Caversham, Standard Bank Gallery,Johannesburg.
2009: A group exhibition, Turbine Hall, Johannesburg.
2008: 10th Anniversary Celebrations Exhibition, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2007: Intel Promotional Exhibition, Sandton Square, Johannesburg.
2006: Renault Artists, Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg.
2005: RENAULT ART & CULTURE, Vehicle Showroom @ Gateway, Umhlanga.
2005: Art @ Home, Residence of Angie Bishop and Sandy Batchelor, Kloof.
2004: Summer, African Art Centre, Durban.
2004: Midlands Biennale, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2002-3: Untold Tales of Magic: Abelumbi, Durban Art Gallery, Durban; Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg; Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg; Carnegie Art Gallery, Newcastle; Oliewenhuis Art Museum, Bloemfontein; TEACH Museum, Empangeni; Pretoria Art
Museum,Pretoria; William Humphrey Art Gallery, Kimberley; Margate Art Gallery, Port Shepstone.
2002: KZN Art teachers’ exhibition, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2001: Gordon Verhoef & Krause Art in the Park, Alexandra Park, Pietermaritzburg.
2001: Save the Ruth Prowse, Ruth Prowse School of Art, Cape Town.
2001: The Land exhibition, University of South Africa, Pretoria.
2001: University of Natal (Centre for Visual Art) Staff and Post-graduate students' exhibition, Johannes Stegmann Gallery, Bloemfontein.
2000-3: Break the Silence! HIV/AIDS Print Portfolio, Durban Art Gallery, Durban; BAT Centre, Durban; KwaMuhle Museum, Durban; Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg; Iziko South African National Art Gallery, Cape Town; GUS Gallery, Stellenbosch; Gateway Cinema Nouveau Gallery, Durban; MTN, Civic Gallery, Johannesburg.
2000: Natal Arts Trust Biennale 2000, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2000: Yivume Wethu: A Visual Celebration of the national heritage, NSA Gallery, Durban.
2000: University of Natal (Centre for Visual Art) Staff and Post-graduate students exhibition, Michaelis Galleries, Cape Town.
2000: Break the Silence! HIV/AIDS Billboards around the Durban Metro, Technikon Natal, Durban.
2000-3: Jabulisa 2000: The Art of KwaZulu-Natal, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Aspirations: Post-graduate students’ exhibition: Centre for Visual Art, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: The Right to Celebrate, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
1999: Izikhwepha Zethu: Our Strength, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
1999: Ezamandulo: a Heritage Day exhibition, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
1999: Izwe Lethu: Our Land, African Art Centre, Durban.
1999: Our Heritage, Our Image, The BAT Centre, Durban.
1999: University of Natal Staff and post-graduate students art exhibition, Karen McKerron Gallery, Johannesburg.
1999: Ngezandla Zethu Art and Crafts Bazaar, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
1999-2000: Golden Scenario 2000!!! An annual exhibition organised by Golden Scenario Art Projects, The BAT Centre, Durban.
1998: Inhlabamkhosi/ The Clarion Call, The Empangeni Art and Cultural History (TEACH) Museum, Empangeni.
1998: The 1st Annual MACS (Midlands Art and Crafts Society) Art Auction and Exhibition, Midlands.
1998: Young Artists’ exhibition, Harris Fine Art, Cape Town.
1997: Metropolitan Life Art exhibition, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
1996: Natal Arts Trust 6th Biennale exhibition, Carnegie Art Gallery, Newcastle.
1996: Jabulisa: The Art of KwaZulu-Natal, Standard Bank Annual Arts Festival, Grahamstown.
1994: Northern Natal Artists Exhibition, Carnegie Art Gallery, Newcastle.
1994: A group exhibition, NSA Gallery, Durban.
1994-5: Artists Invite Artists, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
1993: Zululand Society of Arts: Members’ Exhibition, Eshowe.

Group Exhibitions (international)


2010: What We See: Reconsidering an Anthropometrical Collection from Southern Africa, Franco-Namibian Cultural Centre (FNCC), Windhoek; Basler Afrika Bibliographien, Basel.
2001-3: Break the Silence! HIV/AIDS Print Portfolio, National Gallery of Botswana, Gaborone; National Art Gallery, Windhoek; UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles; Palais des Nation, Geneva; Lamb Gallery, Dundee; Gracefield Art Centre, Dumfries; Barcelona AIDS 2002 Conference, Barcelona. 

Commissions


2010: Grahaeme Lindop, Johannesburg.
2008: Prof. Extraordinaire, Hans and Babro Engdahl, University of the Western Cape,
Cape Town.
2008: Anette Hoffmann, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2004: Vittorio Meneghelli, Academy Brushware, Germiston.
2002-3: Illustration of annual reports, Lima Rural Development Foundation, Pietermaritzburg.
2001: A barometer for measuring the levels of financial donations to the chest, Community Chest, Pietermaritzburg.
2000: A portrait of King Dingane kaSenzangakhona kaJama, Ncome Museum and Monuments Complex, Dundee.
2000: A mural project in a children’s waiting room, Pietermaritzburg High Court, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Umgeni Water-Amanzi, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Sibongile Mkhize, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: A mural depicting Ruben Tholakele Caluza, an African musician & A new supper room project (executed on behalf of Golden Scenario Art Projects), Pietermaritzburg-Msunduzi City Hall, Pietermaritzburg.
1998: Eleanor Isaacs, Pietermaritzburg

Collections


University of Fort Hare, Alice.
KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Administration Museum Services, Pietermaritzburg.
Carnegie Art Gallery, Newcastle.
The Empangeni Art and Cultural History (TEACH) Museum, Empangeni.
KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Parliamentary Building, Pietermaritzburg.
The Caversham Centre for Artists and Writers, Balgowan.
Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
South African Reserve Bank Collection, Pretoria.
Iziko South African National Gallery (ISANG), Cape Town.
Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
Pretoria Art Museum, Pretoria.
Quarters of the Consulate General of the United States of America, Durban.
National Arts Council of South Africa, Johannesburg.
United Nations Office, Geneva.
Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, Hluhluwe.
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York City.
UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles.
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Washington D.C.
Durban University of Technology Gallery, Durban.
Youth Strategy executive, Dumfries and Galloway, Southern Uplands.
AMPATH National Laboratory Services, Durban.
National Gallery, Windhoek.
National Cultural History Museum, Pretoria.
Renault South Africa, Johannesburg.
Offices of the Premier of KwaZulu-Natal province, Pietermaritzburg.
MTN Arts Foundation, Johannesburg.
Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.

Private Collections include those of former president Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, former government ministers Mangosuthu Buthelezi and Narend Singh, as well as collectors Barbara Lindop, Walter Lindop, Patrick and Sally Enthoven, Prof Extraordinaire, Hans and Babro Engdahl, and Peter Neal.

Awards


2009: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Research Scholarship, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
2006-8: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Doctoral Fellowship, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.

Presented Papers


2013: Natives and ‘other’ Persons may not own so much!: Power and the construction of the South African landscape before and after 1913, 'Land Divided Conference', Robert Leslie Social Science Building, University of Cape Town (in absentia).
2010: Giving Landscape a voice: Photographic dimensions of ‘framing’ power relations in South Africa, 'Bonani Africa Photographic Festival and Conference', South African Museum, Cape Town.
2009: Power Relations in Santu Mofokeng’s Landscape Photography: A Critical Reflection, 'PSHA 4th War and the Everyday Colloquium', Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2009: Reflections on South African Landscape Photography with particular reference to David Goldblatt, 'Brown Bag Seminar', Interdisciplinary Center for the study of Global Change (ICGC), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
2008: Land and Human Values: Landscape photographs by David Goldblatt. 'PSHA Colloquium', Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2008: South African Photography: History and concept of landscape, 'Post-graduate Seminar', Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2007: Critical Analysis of Landscape photographs by David Goldblatt and Santu Mofokeng, 'Symposium', Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2006: Power Relations in Landscape Photographs by David Goldblatt and Santu Mofokeng, research paper, Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.
2002: Isizathu nokubaluleka komsebenzi wokwenziwa komfanekiso-ngqo weSilo sikaZulu uCetshwayo kaMpande, promotional talk, BAT Centre, Durban.
2002: The relationship between Culture and Welfare: Some traditional aspects of the concept of Ubuntu, 'Launch of the Culture and Counselling Centre', Siyahlomula High School, Pietermaritzburg.
2002: The significance of a prestigious commission for the portrait of King Cetshwayo kaMpande of the Zulu, 'Heritage Symposium on Arts, Crafts and Culture', Centre for Visual Art, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg. 
2001: Historical Background and significance of the French art (Barbizon Group and Impressionism) in the permanent collection of the Tatham Art Gallery, talk on anniversary of the death of Prince Imperial Louis Napoleon in 1879, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2001: Witchcraft Images In the Tatham Art Gallery, 'Regional Conference: KwaZulu-Natal Branch of South African Museums Association (SAMA)', Ascot Inn, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Vuminkosi Zulu: Social and Biblical Themes In His Sculpture and Graphic Work, 'The 15th Annual Conference of the South African Association of Art Historians (SAAAH)', Centre for Visual Art, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg.
1998: Making a Living: An Overview of the Ngezandla Zethu Art and Crafts Project. 'Regional Conference: KwaZulu-Natal Branch of South African Museums Association (SAMA)', KwaMuhle Museum, Durban.
1997: Teaching Art to a Black (African) Child of the post-Apartheid South Africa: A Radical Approach, Women Teachers’ Wing of Natal African Teachers Union (NATU), Impendle Community Hall, Impendle.
1996: Aspects of Landscape Painting in Northern KwaZulu-Natal, 'The 12th Annual Conference of the South African Association of Art Historians (SAAAH)', Department of Fine Arts and History of Art, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg.

Workshop and Lectures


2011: Guest Speaker, Awards Presentation Ceremony, Department of Fine Arts and Jewellery Design, Durban University of Technology, Durban.
2008: Conductor of official launch, Hands On! Masks Off! workshop series, National Arts Festival, Grahamstown.
1996 - 2006: Teacher, weekly art workshops, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2004: Exhibition opener, This is Where We Live by Siyabonga Sikhosana, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2001: Guest lecturer, Stages of Development in Child Art: A lecture offered to local pre-school educators, Keep Pietermaritzburg Clean Association (KPCA), Pietermaritzburg.
2001: Teacher, basic drawing skills workshops, Senzokuhle Women’s Group, Mpophomeni Township, Howick.
2000: Teacher, weekly art workshops for children, Ntuthukoville community, Pietermaritzburg.
1999 - 2000: Teacher, Umthangala art appreciation classes: A series of visual literacy workshops for Pietermaritzburg and greater iNdlovu Region township and rural crafters, iNlovu Region.
1999: Speaker, Indima emelwe ukudlalwa nguthisha ongum-Afrika wangekhulunyaka lamashumi amabili nanye: Ukudlinza okuyinjulabuchopho, A thanks-giving party in respect of the academic achievement of Xolisile Felicitus Buselaphi Makhaye, Orients Heights, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Teacher, children’s holiday workshop: Paper collage, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
1999 - 2000: Teacher, bi-weekly art workshops for children, Ntuthukoville community, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Facilitator, children's mural project for Ntuthukoville Community Hall, Pietermaritzburg.
1997 - 1998: Teacher, children’s holiday workshops, Georgetown Library, Pietermaritzburg.
1997 - 1998: Teacher, weekly art workshops for children, SOS Children’s Village, Pietermaritzburg.
1996 - 1997: Teacher, weekly art workshops for inmates, New Pietermaritzburg Prison, Pietermaritzburg.

Committees


2013: Judging Panel Member, ABSA L’Atelier Art Competition, ArtSpace Gallery, Durban.
2011: Board Member, Artists for Humanity (AFH), Fine Arts Department, Durban University of Technology, Durban.
2011: Award Committee Member, eThekwini Living Legends, Durban.
2008: Selection PanelMember, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum Award, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, Port Elizabeth.
2007 - 2010: Chairperson of Visual Art Advisory Panel, National Arts Council of South Africa.
2007 - 2010: Multi-Disciplinary Advisory Panel Member, National Arts Council of South Africa.
2006 - 2010: Board Member of National Arts Council of South Africa.
1999 - 2006: Board of Trustees Member, Vuminkosi Zulu Family Trust, Pietermaritzburg.
1999 - 2006: Exhibitions Committee Member, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
2005: Judging Panel Member, Getting KwaZulu-Natal Learning Competition, Department of Education, Pietermaritzburg.
2005: Member, Msunduzi Arts and Culture Council Forum, Pietermaritzburg.
2005 - 2006: Shop Steward, Independent Municipal and Allied Trade Union (IMATU), Msunduzi Municipality, Pietermaritzburg.
2002: Selection Panel Member, Gordon Verhoef & Krause Art in the Park, Pietermaritzburg.
2002: Selection Panel Member, Environmental awareness Children’s Art Competition, Golden Horse Casino, Pietermaritzburg.
2002: Judging Panel Member, KwaZulu-Natal Prisons Visual Art Competition, National Institute for Crime Prevention (NICRO), KwaZulu-Natal.
2002: Judge, Sabalala Nolwazi Youth Project Art Comptetion, Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg.
1999 - 2001: Management Board Member, Jambo Arts Centre, Pietermaritzburg.
1999 - 2001: Executive Committee Chairman, Golden Scenario Art Projects, Pietermaritzburg and KwaZulu-Natal Midlands.
1999 - 2000: Secretary, Pietermaritzburg regional committee of the KwaZulu-Natal Art and Crafts Council, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Judging Panel Member, Mural Paintings Competition, Sobantu Creche and Pre-school, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Judging Panel Member, The 50th Anniversary Children’s Competition, SOS Children’s Village, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Judging Panel Member, Children’s Day Art Competition, Keep Pietermaritzburg Clean Association, Pietermaritzburg.
1998: Judging Panel Member, Crafts Council Fair, Durban Exhibition Centre, Durban.
1997 - 1999: Founder, Member, Projects Co-ordinator, Golden Scenario Art Projects, Pietermaritzburg and KwaZulu-Natal Midlands.
1997 - 1999: Selection Committee Member, Gordon Verhoef & Krause Art in the Park, Pietermaritzburg.
1996 - 1998: Chairman, KwaZulu-Natal Midlands sub-committee of the Craft Council of South Africa, Midlands.
1997: Judge, World Environmental Day Children’s Art Competition, Ambleton Community Primary School, Pietermaritzburg.
1996: Selection Panel Member, Jabulisa: The Art of KwaZulu-Natal Exhibition, Grahamstown.
1994 - 1996: Acquisitions Committee Member, Carnegie Art Gallery, Newcastle.
1991: Treasurer, Fine Arts Society (FASOC), Department of Fine Arts, University of Fort Hare, Alice.

Workshops Attended


2010: Induction Workshop for newly appointed Academic Staff, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark.
2002: Dead or alive?, Symposium on heritage in Pietermaritzburg, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg.
2001: Changes in emphasis in UK museums from collection based work, to learning, access and combating social exclusion, Seminar paper by Mark Taylor (event organized by the South African Museums Association, SAMA), KwaMuhle Museum, Durban. 
2001: Indigenous Knowledge Workshop, Seminar, Technikon Natal, Durban.
2000: Workshop on outcomes-based education II, Voortrekker, Tatham and Natal museums, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Printmaking Workshop II: lithography and screen printing, The Caversham Press, Balgowan.
1999: Workshop on outcomes-based education I, KwaMuhle Museum (facilitated by Darryl Houghton, Department of Education, organised by SAMA), Durban. 
1999: Open-air visual art workshop, Tatham Art Gallery (organized by the Golden Scenario Art Projects), Pietermaritzburg.
1998: Potato printing on fabric workshop, Old Presbyterian Church, Pietermaritzburg.
1997: Printmaking Workshop: lithography, screen printing, lino-cutting and etching, The Caversham Press, Balgowan.

Other Contributions


2013: Author, Who occupies the “centre”?: Reflections on power relations in Gerard Sekoto’s landscapes and other approaches to landscape painting, catalogue essay for Gerard Sekoto's posthumous 'Song for Sekoto' exhibition, Wits Art Museum, Johannesburg.
2004: Author, Vuminkosi Zulu: A Critical Analysis of Social and Biblical Themes in his Art catalogue essay for 'Veterans of KwaZulu-Natal' group exhibition, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2004: Author, Social, political and cultural aspects of the art of Trevor Makhoba in the collection of the Tatham Art Gallery: A critical analysis and assessment, catalogue essay for Trevor Makhoba's yet unrealised posthumous exhibition, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2002: Author, Spiritual Connotations of Magic/Witchcraft: A biblical perspective, catalogue essay for 'Untold tales of magic: Abelumbi', Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2000: Yehoshua comforting an AIDS victim (print), presented to Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, by Artists For Human Rights Trust Committee on 11th October, Technikon Natal, Durban.
2000: C0-curator, Organiser, Media Writer, Yivume Wethu: a visual celebration of the national heritage group exhibition, N.S.A. Gallery, Durban.
1999 - 2000: Co-curator, Organiser, Media Writer, Golden Scenario 2000!!! group exhibition, Menzi Mchunu Gallery; Democratic Gallery; BAT Centre Trust; Durban Harbour, Durban.
1999: Logo Designer, Isizinda samaDeke, an inter-provincial organisation aimed at maintaining solidarity among the Makhaye clan, South Africa.
1999: Compiler, April-June Golden Scenario Art Projects newsletter, Pietermaritzburg.
1999: Illustrator, Fidelities V poetry magazine cover, Pietermaritzburg.
1998: Author, catalogue essay for Vuminkosi Zulu's Retrospective Exhibition, Standard Bank National Arts Festival, Grahamstown.
1998: Co-ordinator, Inhlabamkhosi-The Clarion Call group exhibition,Empangeni Art and Cultural History Museum, Empangeni.
1997: Co-ordinator, Catalogue Compiler, Metropolitan Life group exhibition, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.
1997: Designer, Golden Scenario Art Projects logo, Pietermaritzburg.
1996: Co-founder, Golden Scenario Art Projects, Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg.

Texts

Conservation with Mario Pissarra, Making sense of what landscape is about, ASAI, 2021.

Xolile Mtakatya

b. Cape Town, 1968

Xolile Mtakatya’s works capture the cacophonic, quasi-apocalyptic everyday of Black social life in South African townships. By employing bright, sometimes jarring colour, bold lines, and by crowding his compositions with elements, Mtakatya’s images  engage the viewer’s full sensorial range, somewhat exceeding the flat plains of their surfaces.

Personal History


Mtakatya began drawing on the walls while a political detainee in 1986. As a youth activist in the late 80s and early 90s, he ran art and media workshops in his community and taught screen-printing to unemployed mothers, with the Philani Project. He also ran media training workshops for the African National Congress, and was an active member of the Visual Arts Group (1988 - 1993).

Arts Education


1993: Diploma, Fine Art, Foundation School of Art, Cape Town.
1987 - 1989: Part-time student, Community Arts Project, Cape Town.

Solo Exhibitions (South Africa)


2005: Episodes, Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town
1993: Diploma show, Foundation School of Art, Cape Town.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2010: Creative Block: 150 artists, Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town. Embassy of Spain, Cape Town.
2010: 1910-2010 From Pierneef to Gugulective, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town
2009: Art from Southern Africa, Anglican Aids and Healthcare Trust, Cape Town.
2009: Isibane, Lookout Hill, Khayelitsha, Cape Town.
2009: Winter Solstice, Cape Gallery, Cape Town.
2008 Desire, Cape Gallery, Cape Town.
2008: 16th Annual Salon, Rose Korber Art, Cape Town.
2007: Why Collect, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2007: ReCenter, Lookout Hill, Khayelitsha.
2007: & Beyond Encryption, Cape Gallery, Cape Town
2005: Botaki: Exhibition 4, Old Mutual Asset Managers, Cape Town.
2005: Finding You, Association for Visual Art Gallery, Cape Town.
2005: 14th Annual Salon, Rose Korber Art, Cape Town.
2003: Trilogy: Innocence, Awakening and Fulfillment, Sanlam Gallery, Cape Town.
2001: Cats, Rose Art Consultancy, Cape Town.
2000: Itheko lokuza nethemba elitsha (A Celebration for Bringing New Hope), Bell-Roberts Art Gallery, Cape Town.
1999: Xolile Mtakatya/ Lundi Mduba, Association for Visual Arts Gallery, Cape Town.
1997: Trans Figurative, Association for Visual Arts Gallery, Cape Town.
1991: Visual Arts Group Travelling Exhibition, Centre for African Studies, University of Cape Town.
1988: End Conscription Campaign, Michaelis School of Art, University of Cape Town.
1987: Exhibition, Community Arts Project, Cape Town.
1986: Eye of an Artist, St. Gabriels Catholic Church, Gugulethu, Cape Town.

Group Exhibitions (International)


2004: Assemblage, The affordable Art Show, Batttersea.
2004: The ID of South African Artists, Fortis Circustheater, Scheveningen.
1999: Conflux, Tendances Mikado Gallery, Luxemburg.
1998: Art Beyond Borders, City Hall, Augsburg.
1997: Liberation in South African Art, Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery, Birmingham.
1993: Manyano, Museo Etnografico Azul, Buenos Aires.
1990 - 1991: Art from South Africa, Museum of Modern Art, Oxford; Mead Gallery, University of Warwick; Aberdeen City Art Gallery; Royal Festival Hall, London; Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham; Bolton Art Gallery, Lancashire.

Collections


Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
Old Mutual, Cape Town.
Spier Art Collection, Stellensbosch.
Stellenbosch Modern and Contemporary (SMAC) Gallery, Stellenbosch.
Nandos, London.
Mayibuye Centre, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town.

(Mtakatya's work is also included in numerous private collections in South Africa, the Netherlands, Germany and the United States of America.)

Workshops & Residencies


2005: Thupelo International Workshop, AMAC - Arts and Media Access Centre (fka Community Arts Project), Cape Town.
2001: Residency, Caversham Press, KwaZulu-Natal.
2000: Thupelo International Workshop, Goedgedacht Centre, Malmesbury.
2000: Mural Global Agenda 21, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), Hagen; Aachen.
1999: Thapong International Artists Workshop, Gaborone.
1999: Mural Global Agenda 21, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), Essen; Arte-Mobile - mural painting on a truck, Osnabruck.

Publications


2009: Cape Times, May 21.
2008: SA Art Times, issue 11 vol. 3, November.
2006: Mario Pissarra, Botaki Exhibition 4: Conversations with Tyrone Appollis, (catalogue) Old Mutual Asset Managers, Cape Town.
2004: J Van den Ende & S Khan (eds), Identity: The ID of South African Artists, Stichting Art & Theatre, Amsterdam. 2004: Mario Pissarra, Botaki: Conversations with Timothy Mafenuka, (catalogue) Old Mutual Asset Managers, Cape Town.
1999: Project Conflux, (catalogue) Association for Visual Art, Cape Town.
1990: E David, Art from South Africa, Museum of Modern Art, Oxford.

Links

Timothy Mafenuka

Timothy Mafenuka

Timothy Mafenuka (1966-2003) was born in Guguletu but raised in Tsomo in the Eastern Cape. He returned to live in Cape Town in 1982, settling soon after in Khayelitsha. Self-taught, Mafenuka’s imaginative art provides an enchanted view of the natural world, expressed through a creative use of materials.

Education


Self taught. Informally mentored by Xolile Mtakatya.
Several regional Thupelo Artists Workshops.

Exhibitions (solo)


2003 ‘Miracle of the Universe’, Greatmore Studios, Woodstock, Cape Town.
2003 DC Art, Cape Town
1992 Dorp Street Gallery, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Exhibitions (group)


2007 Exhibition #1. Gill Alderman Gallery, Kenilworth.
2007 Exhibition to accompany international conference of Jungian psychologists, Cape Town International Conference Centre. Curated by Josie Grinrod and Kate Gottgens.
2004 ‘Botaki’, Old Mutual Asset Managers, Pinelands, Cape Town.
2001 ‘Imbizo-Gathering’, AVA, Cape Town.
2001 ‘Homecoming’, Gug’Sthebe, Langa, Cape Town.
2001 Alfred Mall Gallery, Waterfront, Cape Town.
1997 St. Stephen Church, Riebeeck Square, Cape Town.
1993 ‘Made in Wood: Work from the Western Cape’, South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
1992 Visual Arts Group, Mayibuye Centre, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa;
1992 Centre for African Studies, University of Cape Town.
1992 30 Sculptors from the Western Cape, US Gallery

Collections

South African National Gallery; numerous private collections in South Africa and abroad.

Commissions

Woolworths.

Publications


2013 Mario Pissarra, 'Against the Grain’, Cape Town : Africa South Art Initiative.
2004 Mario Pissarra, ‘Botaki: Conversations with Timothy Mafenuka’, Old Mutual Asset Managers, Cape Town.
2003 Martin, Proud et al (1993); Big Issue
1993 Martin, Marilyn; Proud, Hayden; et al, ‘Made in Wood: Work from the Western Cape’, South African National Gallery, Cape Town

Miracle of the Universe

© Mario Pissarra, 1/12/2005

Miracle of the Universe in the context of African sculpture

It is widely believed that South Africa and most of its neighbors have little of a wood sculpture “tradition” to compare in quality and interest with the rest of sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed it was only after the landmark exhibition “Tributaries” that South African wood sculptors really registered on the map. However while Tributaries redrew the boundaries for “sub-Saharan wood sculpture” it inadvertently created the impression that wood sculpture in South Africa was largely an isolated pocket of cultural expression (i.e. a phenomenon that, to the layperson, was defined ethnically and geographically as “Venda wood sculpture”).

There have been sporadic attempts to balance this position, by for example exhibitions at the SANG (Made in Wood: Work from the Western Cape) and in KZN (at DAG & the African Art Centre). However these efforts can be considered only moderately successful, in so far as some of South Africa’s finest wood sculptors continue to languish in the margins, while all of the wood sculptors represented in Tributaries have gone on to enjoy considerable opportunity and success. [1]

Miracle of the Universe in the context of the life and art of Timothy Mafenuka (1966-2003)

Born in Guguletu, Mafenuka spent much of his childhood in the rural village of Tsomo in the Eastern Cape where as a herd boy he carved wooden sticks and spoons. After completing his schooling he moved back to Cape Town (c.1982) to look for work. He worked as a fisherman in Namibia and the Eastern Cape, and as a chef at the Cape Sun. In Khayelitsha he came into contact with other local artists, notably Xolile Mtakatya, and by the early 90s he was working as a full-time artist. In the 90s he participated in several group exhibitions, including those of the Visual Arts Group. No less than five of his early works were selected by the SANG for its Made in Wood exhibition in 1992, and one was purchased for their permanent collection. A genuinely self-taught artist, Mafenuka’s qualities were recognised by the Thupelo Workshop who invited him to attend several regional workshops and one international one.

A dapper dresser with trademark pipe and brimmed hat, Mafenuka’s art differed from most of his contemporaries in that he used unorthodox materials that he often combined with wood (including shells, glass, sand, and rubber). However it was not only his lack of exposure to art education from NGO’s such as CAP, and his choice of materials that set him apart from of his contemporaries. Enchanted by the twin joys of life and the act of creation Mafenuka avoided the dominant themes of poverty and protest. In their place he developed a magical world of the imagination, ably expressed through his evocative imagery, striking use of materials, and (particularly in his prints and paintings) a vibrant use of colour.

As enterprising as he was innovative and resourceful Mafenuka’s lyrical mono-prints and smaller sculptures can still be found in small galleries across the Cape. He was also one of the few “St Georges Mall artists” who took a small shop for himself at the Pan-African Market. In recent years he held two solo shows, unfortunately both at low-key venues (DC Art, Cape Town; and according to his family another in Pietermaritzburg). When he fell ill last year a retrospective exhibition was organised on his behalf at Greatmore Studios.

Mafenuka’s crowning achievement as an artist has never been seen by a wide audience. His forte was wood sculpture, and c. 1992 he produced his first large totemic sculpture. In total he made only six of these. Three of them were bought by private collectors (from the UK, Japan, and Cyprus). Three remain in the collection of the family. The most ambitious of these is “Miracle of the Universe” which stands at over eight feet tall. That he knew he had created something special is not only evident in the title, but also in the fact that his signature appears no less than three times on the work!

Mario Pissarra 16 February 2004

Originally written as a motivation for the purchase of Miracle of the Universe by the South African National Gallery. The motivation was successful.

[1] With the tragic exception of Nelson Mukhuba