Celestino Mudaulane

b. 1972, Maputo Mozambique.

Mudaulane (Mondlane) produces innovative, often monumental ceramic sculptures as well as large, striking drawings. His works are highly imaginative, visualizing a world that mediates the material and the spiritual, the playful and the confrontational.

(Please note that this page is under construction)

Education


1997 Faculty of Fine Arts, Porto (workshop or internship)
1997 University of KwaZulu Natal (workshop or internship)
1994 Art Foundation, South Africa (workshop or internship)
1992 Completed ceramic course, National School of Visual Arts (ENAV), Maputo

Positions held


Founder member, Muvart
Member, Nucleo de Arte, Maputo
Lecturer in ceramics, design and drawing, National School of Visual Arts (ENAV), Maputo

Solo Exhibitions


1997 Núcleo de Arte, Maputo

Group Exhibitions (Mozambique)


2010 Ocupações Temporárias, Maputo
2006 Expo Arte Contemporanea, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
2003 Quero conhecer-te África, Fortaleza de Maputo
2003 Bienal da TDM, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
2003 Exposição Colectiva de Artes Plásticas, Instituto Camões, Maputo
2002 Exposição de Pintura, Desenho, Escultura e Cerâmica, Fundação Alberto Chissano, Maputo
2001 Bienal TDM, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
2001 Contra a Violência Infantil, Centro Cultural Franco-Moçambicano, Maputo
2000 Plasticidades em Moçambique, Instituto Camões, Maputo
1999 Expo Annual Musart, Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo
1993 2º Workshop, Escola Nacional de Artes Visuais, Maputo

Group Exhibitions (International)


2014 Celestino Mudaulane, Goncalo Mabunda, Mauro Pinto, Galeria 111, Lisbon, Portugal
2011 Idioma Comum, Fundação PLMJ, Lisbon, Portugal
2008 Arte Lisboa 08 - Feira de Arte Contemporânea, FIL, Lisbon, Portugal
2007 Muvart Nouva Africa, Antico Palazzo della Pretura di Castell ‘Arquato, Milan, Italy
2006 Arco’06 - Feira de Arte Contemporânea, Madrid, Spain
2006-08 Replica e Rebelda, travelling exhibition organized by the Camoes Institute
2004 Arte Lisboa 04, Lisbon, Portugal
1997 Exposição de Pintura e Cerâmica, Escola Secundária de Soares dos Reis, Porto, Portugal

Awards


2003 1º Prémio de Cerâmica, Bienal da TDM, Maputo
2003 Prémio de Consagração, Fundação Alberto Chissano, Maputo
1999 1º Prémio de Cerâmica, Expo Annual Musart, Maputo

Publications


2007 Muvart Nouva Africa, Antico Palazzo della Pretura di Castell ‘Arquato, Milan (catalogue/ brochure), Pedro Campos Costa (curator)
2006 Museu Nacional de Arte, Maputo Expo Arte Contemporanea (catalogue, international exhibition
2001 Bienal TDM (catalogue). Edited by Andre Salamao Mabjala and Ciro Pereira
1999 Expo Annual Musart. Museu Nacional de Arte.

Dathini Mzayiya

b. Queenstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa, 1979. Lives in Cape Town.

Dathini Mzayiya skillfully blends drawing and painting in his striking renditions of everyday subjects.

Umsi

© Mario Pissarra, 30/01/2006


Image: Dathini Mzayiya “Rewinding at the End of the Day II” 2005

Umsi (the smoke) is a group exhibition featuring Lindile Magunya, Ndikhumbule Ngqinambi, Thulani Shuku, Dathini Mzayiya, Lonwabo Kilani, and Vivien Kohler. Inspired by Magunyas “documentation of the ongoing burning of the shacks in his area”; the artists share a “common concern around the housing problems in the Western Cape [and are] questioning the ongoing burning of the informal settlements”. They believe that through coming together they can “voice these social issues louder than an individual can.” The motivation for collective action is also a practical one. The artists, who between them have studied at every local institution accessible them, primarily NGO’s, colleges and workshops, “decided to create our own opportunities [to build] our group career as well as our individual careers [due to] the gap …between galleries and emerging artists, and … the lack of resources for …solo exhibitions” Guided by emerging curator Vuyile Voyiya, who has been mentor to the group, these paintings come from a workshop held last year as well as from works produced subsequently.

Magunya provides the most explicit interpretation of the theme with The Cries and Abandon, which utilises a simple but effective split frame composition. Generally he does a decent job capturing the texture and character of objects but he struggles with resolving the tension between the pictorial representation of debris with the production of sophisticated commodities (art). His solutions: to simulate through paint on canvas the illusion of a torn edge, or to physically severe edges of his board and to present them in black tomato boxes, were perhaps better ideas than results. In particular the sawn edges appear contrived, and he may have been better served by painting on real debris.

Mzayiya, particularly with his two paintings titled Rewinding at the End of the Day, presents a less direct take on the theme by addressing the need for social spaces for dialogue. His larger than life seated figures are wedged into corners and pressed against walls, their shadows emphasising their marginality. He demonstrates both graphic and gestural sensibilities but the overall result is essentially realist in its convincing representation of ordinary people in everyday guise.

Ngqinambi creates an extraordinary interplay between a tightly modelled naturalism, seen primarily in his figures, with his painterly treatment of the natural elements where the boundaries between land and sky are as fluid as the shifts between the evocation of a deep illusory space and the affirmation of a flat painted surface. Consequently his figures occupy a liminal space that communicates a sense of waiting. A series of small paintings highlights the artist’s ability to skilfully evoke epic narratives without resorting to large scale.

Kilani demonstrates an impressive proficiency for drawing. His birds eye perspectives on solitary sweeping men are extremely effective. The contrast of fairly acute illusory space with flat, textured ground is a striking compositional device that establishes a sudden sense of finding oneself on the precipice of a silent excavation. However as a painting the flat ground lacks interest and suggests that it is the second hand repository of an idea, rather than a painterly resolution of the artistic process.

Kohler combines an unusual method of painting in oils on tile grout, with a more orthodox painting technique that constitutes a painterly realism. He incorporates rusted, found objects, generally separating them from the painted areas. A convincing painter he should be wary of concepts that come uncomfortably close to cliché: his visual realisation of roots as rusty being an example.

While most artists reveal strong graphic inclinations Shuku is undisputedly more painter than anything else. His gestures are almost flamboyant, a ‘wild’ emotive style that communicates urgency, chaos, disintegration and fragmentation. He is less successful in his inclusion of small, circular, decorative details, presumably as a contrast to his audacious, explosive brushstrokes, as these come across as superfluous doodles that add little value to his works.

Overall Umsi is a coherent and inspiring group exhibition. It boldly affirms the relevance of painting for an emerging generation who are determined to make their mark as socially concerned and professionally motivated artists.

Mario Pissarra 30 January 2006

[All quotes come from artists’ statements accompanying the exhibition.]

NB An edited version of this review appeared in Art South Africa vol 4 no 3, 2006

Portrait of a Revolutionary edited by Nadine Cloete For African Noise Foundation. 

Umfanekiso ( Reflections)
Filmed by Dathini Mzayiya, edited by Caleb Heymann South Africa for the One Minute Video Festival.2008

 

Education


2001 Community Arts Project, Woodstock, Cape Town, South Africa.
2000 Graphic design and advertising, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town.
1999 Advertising and Marketing, Advertising College of South Africa, Cape Town.

Workshops & residencies

2015: Studio 147 Residency, Cape Town.
2009: Glenfiddich Artist in Residence, Glenfiddich Distillery, Dufftown, Scotland.
2007: Arts and Media Access Centre (AMAC) students Workshop by City Skin design, resulting in a mural at the lower cable station, Table Mountain, Cape Town.
2006: National Heritage Council, African Art Museum, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia.
2006: Umsi (The smoke) painting workshop, Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town.
2005: Mural Global Agenda 21 under UNESCO, Inda Gymnasium, Aachen, Germany.
2005: Mural Global Agenda 21 at the train station, Aachen-Schanz, Germany.
2005: Mural Global Agenda 21, Khayelitsha Training Centre, Cape Town.
2005: Mural Global Agenda 21, Swop painting workshop with students from Mitchells Plain, Manneneberg and Khayelitsha, Luhlaza High School, Khayelitsha, CapeTown.
2005: Mural Global Agenda 21, Painting workshop with AIDS-affected children from the Fikelela Children’s Home, Khayelitsha, Cape Town.
2004: Thupelo Workshop, Iziko South African National Gallery (Annexe), Cape Town.
2002: Thupelo Artists Workshop, Annexe, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2002: Ukuzoba (To draw): From Representational Painting to Abstraction, Community Arts Project, Woodstock, Cape Town.
2002: Ukuzoba (To draw) public workshops, Baden, Austria; Villach, Switzerland, and Berlin (with Trish Lovemore and Boyce Magandela)
2002: Mural painting workshop, Nomlingaliselo Primary School, New Crossroads, Cape Town (with Sipho Hlathi, Lonwabo Kilani and Ndikhumbule Ngqinambi).

Solo exhibitions

2013 Onder die Reenboog Strale, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2005 Pop-up exhibition, BBK Gallery, Aachen.

Group exhibitions


2020: Untitled 24.09, Gallery Fanon, Johannesburg.
2019: Kulcha Festival, St John’s College, Johannesburg.
2017: Athlone in Mind, Cape of Good Hope, Cape Town. 
2018: Still Life and Life Drawings: A Moment Captured or Preserved?, Iziko South African National Art Gallery, Cape Town.
2016: The Art of Humanity, The Pratt Institute, New York.
2016: People You May Know, Factory of the Arts, Cape Town.
2016: #SITDITAF, North West University Gallery, 
2015: Imago Mundi: The Art of Humanity, Rome.
2015: Map of the New Art, Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Venice. 
2014: Imago Mundi: The Art of Humanity, Treviso.
2011: Kadafi, The Bag Factory, Johannesburg, South Africa.
2010: The Glenffidich Artist in Residence, The Rainbow Experience Gallery, Mandela Rhodes Place, Cape Town.
2010: Nothing is Everything, Word of Art, Woodstock Industrial Centre, Cape Town.
2010: Ityala aliboli/Debt don’t rot, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg.
2010: Milestones, Greatmore Studios, Woodstock, Cape Town.
2010: 30 x 30 artists, Gill Allderman Gallery, Kenilworth, Cape Town.
2010: Botaki Contemporary African Art, Albany Museum, Grahamstown; Mecufe Festival, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
2009: Umahluko, Cape ’09, Lookout Hill, Khayelitsha, Cape Town.
2009: Dada South, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2009: Untitled exhibition, Glenfidich Distillery, Dufftown, Scotland.
2008: Milk Can Art Project, 34 Long Street Art Gallery, Cape Town.
2008: Winter Open Studio, Greatmore Studios, Woodstock, Cape Town.
2007: Africa south, Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town.
2007: Nine South African Artists, Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg.
2006: Umsi/Smoke, AVA, Cape Town.
2006: Nine South African Artists, Hilton Hotel, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
2005: Atelier Haus Aachen Gallery (with Thulani Shuku), Aachen, Germany; Austria and Switzerland.
2004: Artwork Project, Chat Room Communication and Marketing, Cape Town.
2004: Studio exhibition (with Thulani Shuku), Mowbray, Cape Town.
2004: Live Action Painting on Canvas, Cape Town Festival, Company’s Gardens, Cape Town.
2003: Art Angels, Gardens Presbyterian Church, Gardens, Cape Town.
2003: Angels without Wings, Cape Of Good Hope Castle, Cape Town.
2003: Vision, Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town.
2003: Workshop exhibitions (with Boyce Magandela and Trish Lovemore), Maria: Wörth, Reifnitz, Lienz and Kitzbuhel, Austria.
2002: Absolut Secret 7: Absolut Voyeur, AVA, Cape Town.
2002: Members exhibition, Association for Visual Arts (AVA), Cape Town.
2002: Galerie Halde 14, Balden, Switzerland.
2002: Why Cry?, Greatmore Studios, Woodstock, Cape Town.
2002: Ukozoba (To draw) workshop exhibition, Iziko South African National Gallery (Annexe), Cape Town.
2002: Thupelo workshop exhibition, Iziko South African National Gallery (Annexe), Cape Town.
2001: Afro metamorphosis’, Community Arts Project (CAP), Cape Town.

Gugulective Exhibitions


2014: Gugulective Arts Collective exhibition during Creative Week 2014, KwaMlamli’s Place, Gugulethu, Cape Town.
2010 1910-2010: From Pierneef to Gugulective, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2009: Subversion, Gugulective Arts Collective exhibition, Harbour, Hamburg, Germany.
2008: South Africa Performs, HAU Theatre, Berlin (As part of Gugulective Arts Collective and with other global collectives)
2007: Akuchanywa Apha (No pissing), Gugulective, KwaMlamli’s Place, Guguletu; Blank Projects, Cape Town.

Awards


Youth Veteran Award from Khayelitsha Youth Development Forum (KYDF), Cape Town.

Collections


Foreign Press Centre, Cape Town
Chris Barnard Heart Centre, UCT
Villach Town Hall, Austria
Private collections in South Africa and Europe

Jarrett Erasmus

b. 1984, Cape Town. Lives in Johannesburg.

Erasmus works in various media, focusing on current collaboration while thinking about post apartheid realities and its affects on the social dynamics between communities in South Africa as well as the diaspora.


Education


2017  Masters in Fine Art, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016  ZHdk Summer School programme, Zurich, Switzerland
2007 - 2010  Bachelor of Fine Arts, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
2005 - 2006  Design and Visual art Certificate, Arts and Media Access Centre (AMAC), Cape Town, South Africa
2003 – 2005  Cape Peninsula University of Technology Graphic Design

Projects and Exhibitions

2019  The Main Complaint, group exhibition, Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town, South Africa
2018  Curatorial Care, Humanising Practices conference, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South
Africa
2018  Museum Dialogues conference, Goethe Institut, Windhoek, Namibia
2018  Kewpie, The Daughter of District Six, public art event in collaboration with Gay And Lesbian Memory in Action and District Six Museum, Cape Town, South Africa
2017  Panelist, Any Given Sunday presentation, African Art in Venice Forum, Italy
2016  Re(as)sisting Narratives, group exhibition, District Six Museum, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2016  Foundations and Futures, group exhibition, Bag Factory Arts studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016  Festival D’Art Urbain, Antanarivo, Madagascar
2016  Straatpraatjies, Burning Museum performance, Cape Town, South Africa
2016  Poetry Circle Nowhere workshop, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2015  Empty Ghosts, Public Art project, Johannesburg, South Africa
2015  Artificial Facts: Boundary Objects, group exhibition, Kunsthaus Dresden, Germany (Burning Museum)
2015  Objetos Frontera, CA2M, Madrid, Spain (Burning Museum)
2015  Addressing the Headquarters, presentation, Framer Framed, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Burning Museum)
2015  Cover Version, Gallery MoMo, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2015  Fortunes Remixed, group exhibition. Bag Factory Artist’s Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014  Manufractured, Burning Museum performance, Cape Town, South Africa
2014  Ubuntu Artist Exchange, Studio Museum in Harlem, NY
2014  Plakkers, group exhibition, Brundyn Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2014  Do It, Michaelis Gallery, UCT, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2013  TO LET , Centre For African Studies gallery, UCT, Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Co-Curator, Till it Breaks, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Currency and Curiosity, Joule City Incubator & Research Studio, Cape Town, South Africa
2012  Material Things, solo exhibition, Nafasi Art Space, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2012  S A S, group exhibition, Bag Factory, Johannesburg, South Africa
2011  Mural Painting project at Community House, Salt River
2010  Plures Tectonicus (Many Mansions), Graduate solo exhibition, Albany Natural Sciences Museum Shell Gallery, Grahamstown, South Africa
2006  Mural painting, Artscape Theatre, Cape Town, South Africa

Workshops and Residencies

2018  OpenLab: The Art of Making, artists residency, Richmond, South Africa
2014  Thupelo Artist’s Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa
2014  Arts Aweh Ambassadors programme (facilitator), Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Resident artist, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town, South Africa
2012 Cyan Development Concepts creative development workshops (teacher), Cape Town, South Africa
2012  Visiting Artist Residency, Through the lens: Drawing workshop, NAFASI Art Space, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2012  Visiting Artist Residency, Bag Factory Artist’s Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2012  Artist's workshop, Thupelo, Cape Town, South Africa
2011  Participant and facilitator, Koekenaap artists workshop, Matzikama District, South Africa

 

Awards and Academic achievements


2013  Business and Arts administrative certificate
2012  David Koloane Award
2011  Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (Painting), Masters Degree Scholarship

Experience


2017 - present  Sessional Lecturer, Visual Arts, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014  Infecting the City Festival High Schools programme, South Africa
2013 – 2014  Researcher and Digital archivist, Africa South Art Initiative (ASAI), Cape Town, South Africa
2010 – 2012  Facilitator, Cyan Development Concepts community arts and creative development workshops, Cape Town, South Africa
2009 – 2010 Intern, Artb Gallery, Bellville, South Africa

Assistant (N.R.F. internship), Visual Art undergraduate programme, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
Production Assistant, VOLTA Art Fair, Art Basel, Switzerland
Board member, Thupelo Artists Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa

Jeannette Unite

b. Cape Town, 1964

Jeannette Unite explores Africa’s industrial landscape producing vivid and commanding works in diverse media.

Arts Education


1996 Unisa, Part time, Fine Art
1985 BA Fine Art, University of Cape Town

Exhibitions (solo)


2011 Paradox of Plenty, Michaelis Upper Gallery, University of Cape Town
2010 Fragile Earth, Grande Provence, Franschhoek, Cape Town
2009 Headgear, Turbine hall, Gold of Africa Museum, Johannesburg; Headgears, 9th Tashkent Biennale, Central Asia, Uzbekistan
2008 Remembering the Future, Western Cape Archive Repositary, Cape Town
2007 Hot Earth, Namakwaland – Copper, Thompson Gallery, Johannesburg
2004 Earthscars, A Visual Mining Exploration ‐ Diamonds, Gallery@157, Johannesburg; William Humphreys Gallery, Kimberley; Mozambique National Gallery; Irma Stern Museum, UCT, Cape Town
2002 Sentences, London Zebra Two
2001 Sentences, Bell-Roberts Contemporary Gallery, Cape Town
1999 Thresholds, Irma Stern Museum, UCT
1995 Recent Works, Chelsea Gallery Abstracts, Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town
1993 Recent Works, AVA, Cape Town
1990 Sensuous Images, Wandel Street Gallery, Cape Town

Exhibitions (group)


2017 TAG: Celebrating Greatmore and Thupelo
2016 Beyond Binaries. Essence Festival, Durban
2012 HAWK Group Art Intervention, (curated by Lien Botha) Overberg, Western Cape
2012 Return to the Archive, Museum Africa, Johannesburg
2011 Iizkhwepha Zhetu /Shaping our Minds, (curated by Phumzile Dlamini), Durban Art Gallery
2011 3 Parts: More Harmony, South African, United Emirates & Mozambique artists (curated by Phumzile Dlamini), Durban Art Gallery
2011 Alumni Exhibition & Auction, Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town
2010 6 Meters Under, 4th Beijing International Art Biennale, China
2010 The Lie of the Land: Representations of the South African Landscape, (curated by Michael Godby), Iziko Michaelis Collection, Old Town House
2010 Fragile Earth Glass, Project room, Grande Provence Gallery, Franschhoek
2010 TERRA: Above Below, Oliewenhuis Museum, Bloemfontein
2010 Salon de Confuses, (curated by Andrew Lamprecht) Rose Korber Salon
2009 On Top of the World, (curated by Andre Vorster)
2008 Remembering the Future, Western Cape Archives and Records Services, Old Gaol Building, Roeland Street, Cape Town
Restructuring the Colonial,Thompson Gallery, Johannesburg
2007 Visions of Africa,Pretoria Art Museum,Pretoria
2006 HERM-Boundaries Between Wild & Cultivate, Ann Bryant East London
2005 Portraits,Scarlett Gallery, Greytown.GunfreeSA, Constitution Hill Auction,Johannesburg
2004 Surfacing (with Lynee Lomofsky),Unite Studio Gallery, Cape Town. On The Wall, Earls Court London.Clementina’s Art Gallery,Kalkbay, Cape Town
2003 S.U.M. Bag Factory Residency Exhibition,Fordsburg Art Studios,Johannesburg; The Foundary,Cape Town
1994 Musee D’art Contemp Internationale, Franc Print Trienniale
1993 Aids Awareness,AVA. Brides, Irma Stern Museum, UCT. In Black And White,ISANG
1992Flash Of The Spirit,Baxter Theatre Gallery.Art Now, AVA
1990 Critics Choice, AVA
1989 Red Cross Charity Ceramics Exhibition-Travelled Nationally
1981 Kelloggs Young Artists Exhibition, Cape Town

Workshops & Residencies


2011 Artist-in-Situ, Michaelis Galleries,UCT
2003 Bagfactory, Johannesburg
2001 Thupelo Workshop, Iziko South Africa National Gallery, Cape Town
1999 Thupelo Workshop, ISANG, Cape Town

Collections


Anglo-KUMBA
Development Bank of South Africa
Swiss:Re
MTN
Isiqithi HQ, Johannesburg
Vodacom
Fairbridges
DEVS
PEZULA
UCT Chemical Engineering Building, Cape Town
William Humphreys Museum, Kimberley
Department of Science and Technology, CSIR Building, Pretoria
Clifford Chance, Belgium; Old Mutual Place, London

Publications


2006 Award winning artist in double show. Daily Despatch, May 24
2004 Earthscars. The Star, Johannesburg, Dec. 16. Die swaar voet van die mense. Die Beeld, Dec.
2004 Pick of the week. Cape Town Mail & Guardian, February 20
2004 Energy, emotion and eco-morality. Cape Times, February 25
2004 Minerals incorporated into artists palette. Monday Paper vol. 23. Johannesburg Mail & Guardian, March 1
2002 Gallery scores a major coup with artwork by Nelson Mandela
2002 Ham & High, October 18. Chicken livers with Chocolate sauce. Sinday Times Metro, January 27
2002 Staussin musiikki juhlistiuudenpaaiva Helsingissa. Hesingin Sanomat, January
2001 S.A. art in Finland. Weekend Argus, December 15
2001 Music bring paintings to life. Argus, April 17
2001 Kaukainen Etela-Afrikka onkin hyvin laheinen. Helsingin Sanomat, December
1998 My week in pictures. Sunday Life, November 22
1994 Jeannette unites vibrant energy with her artwork. Sunday Times, May 22
1992 Angry artist puts violence on her walls. Cape Times. Bushmen Art. Cape Times
1990 Female nudes lost in paint. Cape Times, April 9. Artist work strong, thick & gestural. Argus, March 23
1981 Kellogg’syoung artists award. Sunday Times, October 18

Awards


2011 AEGIS Travel Grant to University Autonoma, Madrid Spain
2009 Art Moves Africa (AMA) Travel Grant for Research in Africa
2009 Tashkent Biennale Merit Award for the most original use of natural materials in her work
2006 Glass Wall Installation, Public Art Commission Award, CSIR Building Department of Science and Technology, Tshwane, Pretoria
2004 Oliewenhuys Competition (Glass & Steel Water Sculpture) Shortlisted
2004 Constitutional Hill (Glass & Steel Water Sculpture) Shortlisted
1981 Kelloggs Young Artists Award First Prize competition 4 Year International Art Scholarship

Teaching (art workshops)


2009 Artist materials workshops, Nairobi
2003 Bagfactory staff education
2002-2008 Corporate equity, Old Mutual
1999-2000 Vukani, Nyanga Township, Cape Town Art
1987-1997 Frank Joubert Art & Design Centre (special needs education), Printmaking – etching/ silkscreen/ lino relief printing. Foundation School Art, Education department UCT, Pinelands Adult Education
1986 Franschhoek Art Gallery, facilitator of workshops

Links

Terra : Jeannette Unite (Catalogue)

TERRA: Mining the Artist’€™s Paintbox from the African Industrial Landscape

Ten years ago I started spending time on mines. My shock response to the 40-year old diamond prospecting pits on the paleaolithic African West Coast beach deposits resulted in the first body of work I exhibited as “Earthscars: A Visual Mining Exploration”€ in 2004. This show has travelled in different forms to site significant cities and galleries around the SADC countries. Mining has defined African cultural and socio-political identity and the impact of colonialism and globalization affects how we occupy our current landscape.

The work expanded from Earthscars to exploring rehabilitation plants and environmental relationships. Conversations around visual interpretation of the extractive industry with geologists, engineers, metallurgists, and industrialist’s have further expanded my understanding of mining. I have developed paint and pastel and glass recipes from the advice of earth scientists, geo-chemists, paint-chemists and a ceramicist to develop this ‘€˜eco-alchemic’€™ work.

Over the past decade visual explorations include journeys to Namaqualand, Simon van der Stel’s copper mine, the first colonial mine from 1685, to harbours and construction sites and visits to active gold, coal, salt, manganese, titanium and platinum as well as obsolete and archaeological mine sites. I take photographs from these travels and duplicate images from mining museums and archives, the internet, mining journals and libraries. But the most significant treasures I get from mines are the sands and detritus soiled with history.

My pallette is jars filled with metalliferous and diamondiferous mine dump sand, dust, overburden and metal oxides. My artworks incorporate industrial waste containing enough metal to yield startling colour when molten in kilns in extreme temperatures. The artist as end user of mining re-establishes the art and science link and reminds us that pre-industrial era artists used pestles and mortar in art production. The abstract chthonic glass panels are constructed from recycled detritus and sometime toxic material like lead, arsenic and cyanide that catalyse the mineral and metal reactions.

My material is both subject and object of this corpus of work. Abstract landscapes are made from the actual landscape in a ‘beauty-from-waste’ aesthetic.

I am currently investigating a way to transform current research into work around the issues of the Resource Curse, also known as the ‘paradox of plenty’€™.

Jeannette Unite March 2010

* Originally posted on Frontier Country by Rat Western

Terra Nova Andrew Lamprecht & Ivor Powell (Eds)

A Peer-Reveiwed 192 Full-Colour Monograph on 2 decades of research.2012

Headgear: Mining Engineering Drawings
Critical Interventions, 6: 91-101, Spring 2010

TERRA: Sands and Detritus Soiled with History
Art South Africa, 9(1):98-9, Spring 2010

Exploring the Visual Residues of Colonial Exploitation
Nukta Art:Contemporary Art Magazine of Pakistan. 5 (1): 80-85. 2010

Judy Seidman

b. Connecticut, USA, 1951. Lives in Johannesburg. 
Judy Ann Seidman’s art flows from the twinned beliefs that “culture is a weapon of struggle”, and that “the personal is political” – an approach to culture born in Africa’s liberation struggles. Her paintings, drawings and graphics explore personal and collective experience, emotion, belief and vision; speaking of and to people’s movements, from national liberation and worker struggles to feminism and HIV activism.

Education

1973  Master of Fine Arts (Painting), University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA
1971  Bachelor of Arts (Sociology), University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA

Selected Exhibitions

2005  Na Cidade, Jazz, Luanda, Angola
1984  Botswana National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana
1980  Pentonville Gallery, Islington, London, UK (with Pitika Ntuli)
1980  Institute of Education Gallery, University of London, London, UK (with Pitika Ntuli)
1976  Hemingway Art Gallery, New York, USA
1976  Botswana National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana
1975  Exhibition of paintings and drawings, British Council, Lusaka, Zambia
1974  Exhibition of paintings and drawings, National Library, Lusaka, Zamiba
1973  MFA exhibition, University of Wisconsin Art Gallery, Wisconsin, USA

Workshops, Arts Facilitation & Policy

2016 - present  Facilitator, Feminist Women's Art Network, One in Nine campaign, South Africa
2008 - 2012  Facilitator, One in Nine advocacy media and Naledi Ya Meso art-making and gender workshops, CDP Trust, Johannesburg, South Africa
2007 - present  Facilitator, Khulumani Art Healing and Heritage Workshops, South Africa
1996 - 1997  Member; Curriculum 2005 Arts and Culture Learning Area Committee; Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology; South Africa
1996  Consultant, “Respect for Cultural Diversity” curriculum, SANDF civic education programme, South Africa
1995 - 1996  Member, Arts Education Policy Task Team, Gauteng Ministry of Education, South Africa
1994 - 1995  Sub-committee member, Visual Arts of National Education and Training Forum curriculum development, South Africa
1994 - 1995  Chairperson; Strategic Management Team; Gauteng Department of Sport, Recreation, Arts, Culture; South Africa
1993  Curriculum development, Dakawa Arts and Crafts school, Grahamstown, South Africa
1991 - 2001  Consultant, Curriculum Development Project for the Creative Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa
1988 - 1990  Cultural Studies curriculum development, Foundation for Education with Production, Botswana and Zimbabwe
1985 - 1989  Graphics editor and training supervisor, Mmegi wa Dikgang, Botswana
1978 - 1983  Teacher, Thokoza School, Mbabane, Swaziland
1978 - 1983  Teacher, Maru-a-Pula Secondary School, Gaborone, Botswana

Publications

2017  Drawn Lines, an autobiography of Judy Ann Seidman, Createspace, USA
2013  Justice, redress and restitution: Voices of the widows of the Marikana Massacre, Khulumani Support Group, Johannesburg
2011  Naledi Ya Meso Handbook, CDP Trust
2011  Art as Advocacy Handbook, CDP Trust
2010  One Woman, Sketches/diaries, letters/notes: Fragments from Anita Parkhurst Willcox, Createspace, USA
2007  Katorus Stories, SAHA, Johannesburg
2007  Red on Black , the story of the South African Poster Movement, STE, Johannesburg 
2005  Hlanganani Basebensi: A brief history of COSATU 
2005  Every worker a union member, COSATU Collective, Johannesburg
2002  My Comrade with AIDS is still my Comrade, COSATU Collective, Johannesburg
2001  The Social Protection handbook, COSATU Collective, Johannesburg
1993  Fighting AIDS, National Progressive Primary Health Care Network booklet
1991  Images of Defiance: Protest Posters from South Africa 1980 - 1990, Raven Press (Written together with Posterbook Collective)
1990  In Our Own Image, textbook for  secondary school level Cultural Studies, for Southern Africa, FEP, Gaborone, Botswana
1979  Bayezwa: Paintings and drawings of Southern Africa, South End Press, Boston, Ma., USA

Writing

2016  National liberation is necessarily an act of culture: Visual arts of the armed struggle in Southern Africa, paper given at Conference Politics of the Armed Struggle in Southern Africa
2013  Khulumani! Talking to the concept, structure and outcomes of Khulumani Support Group’s Art, Healing and Heritage Workshops, paper by Judy Seidman and Nomarussia Bonasa for Khulumani Support Group at Dance for Life conference
2010  The Art of National Liberation; Thami Mnyele and Medu Art Ensemble retrospective, Thami + Medu exhibition catelogue, JAG and Jacana Press
2010  Education for liberation, Chimurenga magazine
2006  Drawn Lines: Belief, Emotion, and Aesthetic in the South African Poster Movement in Phillippa Hobbs, ed. "Messages and Meaning: the MTN art collection", MTN, Johannesburg
2004  South African Art Historians, with Jillian Carman, paper on South African Poster Movement, Durban, South Africa
1997  Imagery and AIDS in South Africa, paper presented to Images and Empire conference in Yale University, Connecticut, USA
1992 - 1994  Africa South and East, Johannesburg
1986 - 1989  Medu Art Ensemble Newsletter, Gaborone, Botswana

Other

2006 - 2008  Curator, Poster Collection, South African History Archive, Johannesburg, South Africa
2004  Specialist advisor, Images of Defiance, MuseumAfrica, Johannesburg, South Africa
1995 - 1997  Executive member, Arts and Culture Alliance, Gauteng, South Africa
1994 - 1995  Executive member, Arts Educators Association, Gauteng, South Africa
1981 - 1985  Member, Medu Art Ensemble, Gaborone, Botswana

Collections

Botswana National Museum and Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana
Mayibuye Centre, Cape Town, South Africa
MTN collection, Johannesburg, South Africa
Museum of Revolutionary Art, Leningrad, Soviet Union
Museum of Modern Art, New York
South African History Archive, Johannesburg, South Africa

Kristin NG-Yang

b. 1970 Shandong, China. Lives in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Kristin NG Yang draws on her dual Chinese and South African identity to reflect on questions of migration, nature, agency and identity.

Art Education

Studying for a PhD degree at University of KwaZulu- Natal
2003 Master of Fine Art, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Graduated from Central Academy of Fine Arts (majoring in oil paint painting), Beijing, China

Solo Exhibitions

2017 Perceptions & Prejudices, The Other Room, Durban
2016 Bird/Fish Solo Exhibition, Noeli Galley, Shanghai, China
2016 Bird/Fish Solo Exhibition,National Arts Festival, Grahamstown
2016 Bird/Fish Solo Exhibition, Durban Art Gallery & Rivertown Contemporary, Durban
2015 Kristin’s Solo Exhibition, Tamasa Gallery, Durban
2014 Diary in South Africa, Noeli Galley, Shanghai, China
2013 Living in South Africa, Noeli Galley, Shanghai, China
2012 Interpretation, Alliance Francaise, Durban
2008 Art works by Kristin Hua Yang, Fogolino Art Gallery, Trento, Italy
2008 Art works by Kristin Hua Yang, Cassa Rurale di Pergine, Pergine, Italy
2007 Nordic Forest, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2004 Submerged Mindscape, Tamasa Gallery, Durban
2003 MAFA exhibition, Jack Heath Gallery, Pietermaritzburg
2001 Drawing and oil paintings, Jack Heath Gallery, Pietermaritzburg

Group exhibitions


2017 Turbine Art Fair, Johannesburg
2017 Bird/Fish studio I (with Rory Klopper), Bird/Fish studio, Beijing, China
2016 Zhishang - Kongjian, Bird Nest Art Center, Beijing, China
2016 Zhishang - Wanwei, Ban Space, Shanghai, China
2016 Zhishang - Zhishang, National Exhibition Center, Shanghai, China
2015 Zhongshan Art Fair, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
2015 Female Art Exhibition, Naked Eye Gallery, Beijing, China
2014 LiRenWeiMei, ShangShang Art Gallery, Beijing, China
2014 Chufu, Yixing Art Space, Beijing, China
2014 ChongGouYiXiang 1, Yi Space, Beijing, China
2014 Exhale, Art Space Durban
2013 Sound From Africa, East Gallery, Guanlan, China
2013 The 2nd Chinese Young Artist selected Prints Exhibition, 798 Art Zone, Beijing & Qingdao art Gallery, Shenzhen, China
2013 What Lies Beneath, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2013 Consider China, Art Space Durban, South Africa.
2013 Chun Guang Za Xian, Yi Gallery, Beijing, China.
2012 Across the parallel lines (with Diane Victor), East Galley, Guanlan, China
2012 Lady of the Forest, Inky cuttlefish Studio, London, UK
2012 Art on Paper, Nairobi National Museum, Kenya
2011 Emerging Artist from South Africa, Pangyongjie Studio, Beijing, China
2010 10 Years, 10 Artists, Tamasa Gallery, Durban
2010 Art exhibition, St Paul secondary school, London, U.K.
2010 Red Eye, Durban Art Gallery, Durban
2010 Woman's Day, Durban Art Gallery, Durban
2010 Jabulisa 2001, Tatham Art Gallery, Travelled to Durban, Margate, Empangeni, Eshowe Museum and Newcastle
2009 Cultural Landscapes, Turbine Hall, Johannesburg
2008 CVA exhibition of staff and graduate students, Jack Heath Gallery, Pietermaritzburg
2008 Annual members exhibition, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2007 Pure and Simple, duet exhibition at ArtSpace, Durban
2007 Intel Exhibition of Art Works, Johannesburg and Cape Town
2007 Woman's Day, Durban Art Gallery, Durban
2007 A4 from Durban, ArtSpace Berlin, Germany
2007 Annual members exhibition, KZNSA Gallery, Durban
2006 Renault Artists: Everard Read Gallery, Johannesburg; Renault exhibition hall, Port Elizabeth & Renault exhibition hall, Paris, France

Scholarships


2002 Top 45 Postgraduate Student Scholarship, University of KwaZulu-Natal
2001-2003 & 2010-2012 Rita Strong Scholarship

Lionel Davis

b. 1936, District Six, Cape Town. Lives in Muizenberg, Cape Town.

A former political prisoner, Lionel Davis’ name features prominently in the history of the Community Arts Project, Vakalisa Art Associates, Thupelo Workshop and Greatmore Artists Studios. Drawing, painting, and printing, and often combining these media, Davis works in visual modes that range from the realist to the abstract. His themes include everyday scenes as well as reflections on black and African identity.

This was initially published online in 2003 (on the Africa Centre’s Contemporary Africa Database, now defunct). It appears here in its original form.
Lionel Davis profile (published at www.africaexpert.org.uk)

Political activist and prisoner turned artist and educator, Lionel Davis cuts a distinct figure in the South African arts and culture landscape. A living archive, he has lived a significant part of his life in or on two of apartheids most notorious symbols, District Six and Robben Island. He has also been closely involved with two key arts organisations, the Community Arts Project (CAP) and the Thupelo Workshop.

It was at an early age growing up in District Six that Davis “became aware of the brutality of police, especially white police, in their attitude to and treatment of people of colour”. Davis says that “this became more of an issue for me, and I always used to stand up for people who were being pushed around. This got me into trouble, and into fights… I was caned once by the police for allegedly hitting a white woman in Woodstock, when I was trying to defend a colleague…”. Aware of the need to educate himself Davis attended night school (on the site where Harold Cressy School now stands), where then in his mid-twenties, he met members of the Non European Unity Movement (NEUM) and began attending political meetings. Davis joined APDUSA (African Peoples Democratic Union of South Africa), an off-shoot of the NEUM, but grew disenchanted with them, describing APDUSA as a “theory shop”. He was part of the core group led by Neville Alexander that broke away from APDUSA to form the Mao Tse Tung inspired National Liberation Front, whose goal was to use arms to overthrow the state. In 1964 he was among a group of eleven that was sentenced to gaol for ‘Conspiring to Commit Sabotage’.

During his seven year sentence Davis completed his schooling by correspondence. Released in 1971 and placed under house arrest he worked as a labourer and then a clerk on building sites, until one day in 1978 he chanced upon CAP, then in infant form. At CAP Davis would go on to play multiple roles for over two decades. From his initial role as cleaner/ handyman/ assistant administrator and student, Davis went on to be a long serving art educator/trainer/ facilitator, specialising in drawing, screen-printing and mural painting, teaching children, youth and adults. He also played a leadership role in CAP: he was elected chairperson in 1988, playing the role of co-ordinator (or acting director); and in the nineties he served two years as a Trustee.

Prior to CAP, Davis’ had no previous art tuition. His art experience was limited to his childhood, drawing cartoon heroes with found materials on the streets and walls of District Six. At CAP he proved to be a diligent student, quickly mastering drawing, the medium that has remained the back-bone to his artistic practice. He was introduced to lino-cut printing by resident artist Mpathi Gocini, who came to CAP via the Evangelical Arts & Crafts Centre in Natal, better known by its location at Rorkes Drift. In 1980 Davis went to Rorkes Drift where he spent two years, returning to Cape Town with a diploma in Fine Arts. It was at Rorkes Drift that Davis learned new graphic techniques and began to appreciate the potential of screen-printing as a medium. His stay there was also important for his artistic development because it brought him into contact with other black artists nationally, paving the way for his later involvement with the Thupelo Workshop.

In 1982 Davis assisted in organising the Cape Town contingent to attend the Culture & Resistance Symposium in Gaborone, organised by the African National Congress (ANC). This is widely regarded as a seminal event which was responsible for recognising the role of artists in cultural resistance, and for shifting the notion of ‘artist’ to that of ‘cultural worker’. A direct outcome of this event was the establishment of a Poster Workshop at CAP. It was here, and its later incarnation as the CAP Media Project that Davis was active for most of the 80s as a screenprint facilitator. Initially most of this work involved producing posters, t-shirts, and banners, much of it political in content. Much of this was done on behalf of political and community organisations, and was frequently banned or confiscated by authorities; whereas his later work for the Media Project entailed training members of community and political organisations to produce their own media.

Davis also played a political role at CAP, especially in countering what he perceived as the hegemonic tendencies of political organisations.Following the launch in 1983 of the United Democratic Front (the internally based resistance movement that was politically aligned to the ANC), there was pressure on CAP to affiliate to the UDF. Similar pressures resurfaced in the late eighties. Davis says of CAP that “[although it] wished to play a political role in the struggle it did not see itself as being party political and made its facilities available to all progressive political tendencies.” He is proud of the role he played in communicating CAP’s non-aligned position to a range of political organisations, especially trade unions and community groupings who may have been alienated, or possibly denied access, by a politically aligned CAP.

In 1987 Davis attended the International Triangle Workshop in New York, an initiative that had given rise to the Thupelo Project a few years earlier. Davis was a Thupelo stalwart, serving as a Trustee for eleven years, and attending no less than nine national workshops between 1986 and 2001. He also attended triangle affiliated workshops in Botswana and Zimbabwe. Thupelo was initially best known for encouraging exploration of materials, and initially this resulted in a mass of abstract paintings. That many black artists abandoned (at least temporarily) more realist modes of working in favour of a painting style and approach that some radical critiques saw as an expression of American cultural imerialism, meant that Thupelo received a mixed reception on the left, whilst being welcomed by establishment voices such as the SA National Gallery’s Marilyn Martin. For many of the artists who were invited to these workshops, Thupelo was undeniably a liberating experience. For Davis, Thupelo was an important part of his exploration of painting, a media to which he had previously had limited access, and he derided his critics claiming that he had never had the opportunities to ‘play’ with art materials, something that was taken for granted as part of (mostly white) privileged children’s development. He also benefitted from Thupelo’s emphasis on scale, and some of his works from Thupelo, such as African Sunset, are among his best known.

Davis also worked as an art educator for the SA National Gallery (SANG), where he was responsible for teaching primary school teachers from the townships to teach art to children. This built on his experience teaching children (in the early eighties) and as media trainer at CAP, as well as the training he undertook (in the nineties) for a diploma from the Curriculum Development Project in teaching teachers to teach art in schools. He also served as a Trustee of the SANG as part of its first ‘democratically constituted’ Board. While the national galleries of Zimbabwe (who have used Davis three times an international ajudicator) and Botswana have bought works from Davis for their collection, the SANG has yet to acquire one of his works.

Davis’ current employer, the Robben Island Museum, has provided him with the unique opportunity to live on the site where he was once imprisoned. Initially employed as a tour guide along with other former political prisoners, Davis is now employed by the Museum as Heritage Educator and does much of his work with secondary school pupils. He plans to retire in three years, when at the ripe age of seventy we can expect his art to bloom like never before. Indeed Davis’ road to becoming an artist has been a much longer one than most other artists. He was 42 when he started classes at CAP and 58 when he graduated as a Fine Artist at UCT. His work has been exhibited in numerous group shows at home and abroad (USA, England, Germany, Greece), but he has never had a solo show. A Lionel Davis retrospective is clearly overdue.

Mario Pissarra

Kunst for alle. by Toril Kojan, 2005.

 

  Life can be different – Learning Cape Festival, 2004.

 

First Mobil Zimbabwe Heritage Biennale, 1998.

 

  Zimbabwe Heritage, 1997.

 

Zimbabwe Heritage, 1996.

 

  Akal – The Congress of South African Writers – August 88 Vol 1, 1988.

 

Ascent arts student’s publication, February 1984.

 

Songs of a New Dawn – Hymn book

 

Ten Years at Greatmore Studios Cape Town

 

  25 Years of Caversham Press – Artists, Prints , Community. 2011.

 

Reflections from Thupelo International Workshop, 2007.

 

  Botaki 3 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2007.

 

Botaki 2 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2005.

 

  Upfront and Personal – Three Decades of Political Graphics, 2003.

 

Cross Currents – Contemporary art practice in South Africa, an exhibition in two parts, 2000.

 

  Thirty minutes – Installation by nine artists, 1997.

 

Thapong international artist’s workshop Kenya, 1989.

 

  The Neglected Tradition – Towards a New History of South African art, 1988.

 

Thupelo art workshop, 1986.

 

  Art From South Africa, 1990.

 


Making Art in Africa 1960-2010, ed. by Polly Savage. Published by Lund Humphries, December 2014.

 

  Uncontained – Opening the Community Arts Project archive, ed. by Heidi Grunebaum & Emile Maurice. Published by the Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, 2012.

 

Triangle: Variety of Experience around Artists’ Workshops and Residencies. Published by Triangle Arts Trust, 2007.

 

  Visual culture and public memory in a democratic South Africa, Annie Coombes. Published by Duke University Press Books, 2003.

 

Shuld…immer nur die anderen. Published by Flensburger Hefte, 2004.

 

  Turning to one another – Simple conversations to restore hope to the future, Margaret Wheatley. Published by Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2002.

 

Printmaking in a transforming South Africa, Philipa Hobbs & Elizabeth Rankin. Published by David Krut Bookstores, 1997.

 

  Islamic Art and Culture in Sub Saharan Africa, Karin Adahl & Berit Sahlstrom.Published by Uppsala University, 1995.

 

Art From South African Townships, Gavin Younge. Published by Thames and Hudson, 1988.

 

Echoes of African Art, compiled by Matsemela Manaka. Published by Skotaville Publishers, 1987.

 

Jabula Journal – Rorkes Drift student journal. Published by Rorkes Drift Fine Art School, 1981.

 

  Until freedom Dawns – Poetry anthology, Frank Meintjies

 

(School Project) – The Significance of CAP in the lives of Sydney Holo and Lionel Davis, Hannah Schultz

 


 

awakeningspublicationEdited by Mario Pissarra
Texts by Ayesha Price, Barbara Voss, Bridget Thompson, Deirdre Prins-Solani, Elizabeth Rankin & Philippa Hobbs, Ernestine White, Jacqueline Nolte, Lionel Davis, Patricia de Villiers, Thembinkosi Goniwe and Tina Smith, with introduction by Mario Pissarra, forewords by Bonita Bennett and Premesh Lalu, and preface by Nomusa Makhubu.
Design by Carlos Marzia
Date: 2017
ISBN 978-0-620-77209-9

Click here for more information.

 

 

Art Education

1995: Diploma from the Curriculum Development Project in teaching teachers to teach art in primary schools, Johannesburg, South Africa.
1994: B.A. Fine Arts degree, University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa.
1981: Diploma in Fine Arts Evangelical Lutheran Art and Craft Centre at Rorkes Drift, Kwazulu-Natal.
1978:Community Arts Project (CAP), Cape Town.

Workshops & residencies

2005: Caversham Press, KZN, South Africa.
2013: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2010: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2008: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2005: Thupelo, AMAC, Cape Town.
2004: Thupelo, Masibambisani School, Cape Town.
2001: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1997: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1995: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1993: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1992: Pachinpamwe Workshop, Zimbabwe.
1991: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1990: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1989: Thapong International Artists workshop, Botswana.
1988: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1987: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1987: Triangle International Artists workshop,Pine Plains, New York, USA.
1986: Thupelo, Cape Town.

Selected Solo Exhibitions

2009: Maskerade, Association of Visual Arts, Cape Town.
2007: Gill Aldermann Galery, Kenilworth, Cape Town.

Selected Group Exhibitions

2018: Feedback: Art, Africa and the 1980s, Iwalewahaus, Bayreuth, Germany
2015: A Labour of Love, Weltkulturen Museum, Frankfurt.
2007: Conversation In Four Parts (with Barbara Voss, Ruth Carneson and Paul Stopforth), Nelson Mandela Gateway, Cape Town.
2004: A Decade of Democracy: South African Art 1994 2004, National Gallery, Cape Town.
1998: Kaapse Lading, Athens, Greece.
1997: Kaapse Lading, Klein Karoo National Arts Festival, Oudtshoorn.
1995: National Gallery, Cape Town.
1994: [Joint SA exhibition], Museum of Modern Art, London, UK.
1994: National Gallery, Cape Town.
1992: Pachipamwe international artists exhibition, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Bulawayo.
1992: Pachipamwe international artists exhibition, The National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare.
1992: South African Black and White 45 years on, Cape Town [organised by British Council].
1988: Neglected Tradition, Johannesburg Art Gallery.
1987: Triangle International Artist exhibition, Pine Plains, Upstate New York, USA.
1987: Johannesburg Art Foundation.
1987: NSA, Durban.
1987: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1986: Kuns Aus Sud Afrika, series of exhibitions in Germany (including Weltkulturen Museum).
1986: Art in our Time, Cape Town.
1986: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.
1984: Second Carnegie Enquiry into Poverty' in SA.
1982: The Culture and Resistance Festival, Gaborone, Botswana.
1982: Art Toward Social Development An Exhibition of SA Art, National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1981: African Arts Festival, University of Zululand.

Collections


Public collections in South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe.

Public Speaking

2014: Guest speaker at Impressions of Rorke’s Drift, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2014: Guest speaker at Talking Heads, Africa Centre, Cape Town.
2010: Guest speaker with Ahmed Kathrada and Christo Brandt, Freedom Park, Pretoria.
2005: Guest speaker, invited to speak on issues of human rights and colour prejudice, Ontario, Canada.
2002-2003: Guest speaker, invited to speak in multiple platforms such as schools, colleges and national television, Oslo, Norway.
2005: Panelist on human rights conference, University of Connecticut, USA.
1999: Guest speaker at the annual Humor Conference, Saratoga Springs, New York, USA.

Manfred Zylla

b. Augsburg, Germany, 1939. Lives between Munich & Cape Town

Manfred Zylla uses drawing, painting and printmaking to produce biting commentaries on global politics, economy and ecology.

Work created for various Handicap International campaigns

Art Education


1959-1960: Mostly self taught, student with Prof. Butz at the Art Academy in Augsburg, Germany
1957-1960: Apprenticeship as a lithographer in Augsburg, Germany.

Exhibitions (solo)


2014: Prints & Drawings 1960 - 1990, Lanz 7 Gallery, Munich, Germany.
2014: I want to Swim a Thousand Miles, ErdmannContemporary, South Africa.
2013: 120 Days of Sodom, Munich, Germany.
2012: In Retrospect, Oliewenhuis Art Museum, Bloemfontein; William Humphreys Art Gallery, Kimberley; Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
2010: Future Memories, Centro Luigi Di Sarro, Rome, Italy.
2010: Again and Again, Erdmann Contemporary, Cape Town. Future Memories, Centre Luigi Di Sarro, Rome.
2008: New Paintings, Erdmann Contemporary, Cape Town.
2008: Faces of Saron, Suidoosterfees, Artscape.
2008: Portraits, Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees, Oudtshoorn, South Africa.
2007: Faces of Vredendal, Artscape, Cape Town.
2005: Work on Paper, Erdmann contemporary, Cape Town.
2004: Gallery Momo, Johannesburg.
2003: Interim, Munich. Obz Cafe, CapeTown.
1993: Dritte Welt Cafe, Munich; Ecke Gallery Kneipe, Augsburg.
1992: Glokenbachwerkstatt, Munich.
1991: Art des Foyer, Munich.
1990: Association for Visual Arts, Cape Town.
1986: Amnesty International, Munich.
1980: South African Association of Art, Cape Town.
1978: Kleine Schlossgalerie, Munich.
1975: Space, Cape Town.
1966: Ecke Stuben, Augsburg, Germany.
1965: Obere Stube, Ulm, Germany.

Group Exhibitions (South Africa)


2020:  Cafe Ganesh, Observatory, Cape Town.
2016:  Beyond Binaries, Essence Festival, Durban.
2015:  Co-Existence part II – Manfred Zylla, Garth Erasmus and Antonin Mares, Erdmann Contemporary, Cape Town (Click here for opening remarks).
2015:  Cape Town Art Fair, Cape Town.
2015:  Breaking Surface, Galerie NOKO, Port Elizabeth.
2015:  The Industrial Karoo - Fear and Loss, Pretoria Art Museum, Pretoria.
2014:  The Industrial Karoo - Fear and Loss, Oliewenhuis Art Museum, Bloemfontein.
2014:  The Trouble With Memory, Erdmann Contemporary, Cape Town.
2013:  Crossing the Divide, ErdmannContemporary, Cape Town, South Africa
2013:  Re-Drawn Conclusion, ErdmannContemporary, Cape Town
2008:  Painful Earth, Gallery Momo, Johannesburg.
2007:  Artseasons, Franchhoek. 
2007: Riempie Vasmaak (with Garth Erasmus & Roderick Sauls), Erdmann Contemporary, Cape Town.
1985:  Art for Peace, Baxter Theatre Gallery (organised by End Conscription Campaign).
1984  (With Paul Grendon), South African Association of Art, Cape Town.
1980:  Biennale, Cape Town.

Group Exhibitions (International)


2015:  Beijing Biennale, Beijing, China.
2014:  The Secret Garden, Museo di Villa Vecchia, Rome, Italy.
2014:  Twenty: Contemporary South African Art, The Appalachian State University, North Carolina, USA.
2013:  Zylla & Erasmus, EineWeltHaus, Munich, Germany.
2009: (with Garth Erasmus) Fernwarme Kapstadt, BBK Ulm, Germany. Havanna Biennale, Cuba.
1997-2000: Various exhibitions with Handicap International in Munich, Berlin and Augsburg. Designed the Handicap Bus Exhibitions with Sans Papiers.
1993: Art Against Racism, Dritte Welt Cafe, Munich.
1989: South African Anti-Apartheid Festival, Amsterdam.
1987: South African Conference on Literature, Bad Boll, Germany.
1986: 120 Hours Action, Kunstakademie, Munich.
1983: Krieg und Frieden, Bremen, Germany.
1982: Culture and Resistance, Gaberone, Botswana.
1965: Anti-Vietnam War, travelling exhibition through Germany (organised by Workers Union).
1964: Socialistic Realism (from West and East Germany), Augsburg, Germany.
1961: Junge Westen, Recklinghausen, Germany.
1960-1962: Spring and Autumn Exhibition, Artists’ Union, Augsburg, Germany.

Actions


2010: As Is (with Garth Erasmus, Roderick Sauls and Niklas Zimmer), Breytenbachsentrum, Wellington.
2002: (With Charles Bhebe) Mural at Eine Welt Haus, Muenchen. Revised in 2009 (with Garth Erasmus).Numerous performances as a musician.
2002: Voices in Transit, drawings of refugees at Cape Town train station for Cape Town Festival.
1992: Stand Up For Tolerance, billboard action paintings, Muenchen.
1991: Ozone, billboard action paintings, Muenchen.
1990: Puzzle Action (organised by South African Scholarship Fund), Tuebingen, Germany.
1982: Interaction, CAP, Cape Town.Other experience
1961-1970: Worked as a lithographer in various parts of Germany, landscape painter and print maker, mainly in the medium of wood.
1974 -1985: Worked as a lithographer and educator at Hirt and Carter in Cape Town.
1981- 1986: Teacher and organizer at the Community Arts Project, Cape Town.
1981- 1984 Taught photographic image in print making at Michaelis School of Fine Art.

Publications (Books, newspapers, journals)


2009: "Manfred Zylla, Interaction," Critical Interventions: Journal of African art history and visual culture, numbers 3/4 Spring: pp. 206-222.
1989: Sue Williamson, Resistance Art in South Africa (Cape Town: David Philip).
1988: G. Ogilvie, The Dictionary of South African Painters and Sculptors (Johannesburg: Everard Read). Staffrider, Contrast, Cape Times, Weekly Mail, ADA, Varsity, Vula, Tendenzen, Zeitschrift fuer Kulturaustauch Dritte Welt (IKA), Anti-Imperialistic Bulletin (Germany), The Guardian (New York), Tri-Quarterly (USA). Collections Iziko SANG, Oliewenhuis Art Museum, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, Bredasdorp Municipal Collection, University of Cape Town, South Africa; Archiv, Augsburg, Germany; University of Botswana, Botswana.

Private Collections


England, Switzerland, Germany, America, South Africa.

Links

Mpumelelo Melane

b. New Brighton, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 1962.

Education


1990 Training Art Course for cultural workers, Community Arts Project, Cape Town
1988 Joined Imvaba
Fine Arts, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth (incomplete)

Selected Exhibitions


1992 Visual Arts Group travelling exhibition, Centre for African Studies, UCT, Cape Town
1992 Grahamstown Arts Festival, Grahamstown
1990 Touring exhibition, UK and Denmark

Other


2003 - 2005 Art Facilitator, Siyaya Centre for Young Arts
1990 Delegate, Zabalaza Festival, London [Created mural at the Institute of Contemporary Arts with other SA delegates (among them Thami Jali, Sophie Peters, Louise Almon, Helen Sebidi)]

Links

Mthobisi Maphumulo

b. Imfume, Durban, South Africa, 1988.
Mthobisi Maphumulo is a Durban-based multimedia artist and the founder of the Amasosha Art Movement, a collective of young artists working in the city. He uses oil pastel and mono print, making figurative imagery that is critical of capitalism’s historical social constructions, like race and class. Using focused symbolism and strategic titling, Maphumulo’s images are critical of South Africa’s socio-economic realities, and their resulting psychological effects.

Art Education


2015: Certificate in The Business of Art, Curate.A.Space, Durban.
2013: Printmaking Workshop, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2012: Certificate in Mural making, Bremen.
2010: Certificate in Visual Art, BAT Centre, Durban.
2011: Certificate, Velobala weekend art classes, African Art Centre, Durban.

Group  Exhibitions (South Africa)


2019: Articulate Africa, A4 Arts Foundation, Cape Town.
2018: Thupelo International workshop exhibition, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2017: From the horse’s mouth, Ebony gallery, Cape Town.
2017: Members group exhibition, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2016: Beyond binaries, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2016: Essence Festival, ICC, Durban.
2016: 20 Years Later: A Fresh Look at the Bill of Rights, African Art Centre, Durban.
2016: Invisible, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2015: Lessons, Nedbank, Durban.
2015: Joburg fringe, ArtsonMain, Johannesburg.
2015: After Winter, Henry George Gallery, Johannesburg.
2015: Fresh produce, Turbine Art Fair, Johannesburg.
2015: Digital art, BAT Centre, Durban.
2015: Blowing Minds, University of the Free State gallery, Bloemfontein; KZNSA gallery, Durban.
2015: Transformation, Incubation, Activation, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2014: Reflection, BAT Centre, Durban.
2014: Ababhemu, 8 Morrison Street, Durban; Grahamstown Art Festival, Grahamstown.
2014: Hilton Art Festival, Durban.
2014: Bobathathu June 16 exhibition, Sushi Corner, Durban.
2014: Awe, What you say about what?, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2014: Twenty/20 - A clear vision, Growing the Mandela Legacy, Unisa Art Gallery, Pretoria.
2014: Emerging Eyes, African Art Centre, Durban.
2013: Group Exhibition, The Collective art gallery, Durban.
2013: Group Exhibition, Wushwini Art and Culture Heritage Centre, Durban.
2012: Contemporary Voices, African Art Centre, Durban.
2011: Izikhwepha Zethu, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2011: Don’t Panic, Durban Art Gallery, Durban.
2010: Group Exhibition, BAT Centre, Durban.

Group Exhibitions (international)


2018: 7th International Biennial pastel exhibition, Nowy Sącz, Poland.

Amasosha collective exhibitions


2016: Messages from the Soul, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.
2016: Creative pot, Umlazi community hall, Durban.
2016: Hope in the struggle, Amini Florida, Durban.
2015: Siyaya, Greedy Buddha, Umhlanga.
2015: Eye Candy, Hilton Art Festival, Durban.
2015: Umhlabelo, Atelier Shop 2, Durban; BAT Centre, Durban.

Public Art Projects


2010: Mosaic at Sakhithemba Centre, KwaZulu-Natal.
2011: Mural of Inqola noseyili at photography exhibition by Zoro Xaba, Durban.
2011: Renewal of BAT Centre Mural, Durban.
2011: Waterfall Mural, Victoria Market bridge (for Don’t panic exhibition), Durban.
2012: Mural in Concordia-Tunnel, Bremen, Germany.

Collections


Nandos Art Collection, Southern Africa.
Amazwi Contemporary Art, Michigan.
Leiterin der stadtischen Galerie, Bremen.
Durban Art Gallery collection, Durban.
Bertha Foundation collection, International.
Deborra Patta private collection, South Africa.
Kevin Mabanga private collection, South Africa.

Awards


2015: Most promising artist, KZNSA Gallery, Durban.

Other


2012: Facilitator at Wushwini Art and Culture Heritage, Art in school Project, Durban.