Imvaba Arts Association

Imvaba Arts Association was a community organisation which was formed in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, in 1986, during the State of Emergency. Imvaba expressed opposition to the Apartheid regime through visual arts and creative writing. Imvaba was associated with other cultural workers organisations including the Congress of South African Writers (COSAW), and produced banners and media for the trade unions, especially the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU). Imvaba’s first exhibition was held in the trade union offices in Perl Road, Korsten 1988. They also exhibited at the Grahamstown Festival in 1990 and 1991, and in the Art from South Africa exhibition that opened at the Museum of Modern Art, Oxford in 1990, and subsequently toured the UK before being exhibited at the South African National Gallery in 1991.

 

The Curator as Culture Broker: A Critique of the Curatorial Regime of Okwui Enwezor in the Discourse of Contemporary African Art

Sylvester Okwunodu Ogbechie, 23 June 2010

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Prologue

I presented this essay recently at the University of California Santa Cruz, at a conference titled The Task of the Curator. The general audience reception to my presentation showed me that the issue discussed here is being very much debated in the field of African art history. However, few people have written about it. I think formal critical analysis of our work and positions are very important for a field to grow. I am posting it here in the hope that it allows us to start discussing the important issues it touches on.

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Decolonisation of art in Africa: a post-apartheid South African perspective

by Mario Pissarra

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[Note: This was presented at the annual conference of the South African Visual Arts Historians at the University of Stellenbosch, 2008.]

This is not a tightly argued paper, but more of a loose mapping of ideas that have preoccupied me for several years, ideas triggered by the implications of the concept of decolonisation, specifically as it has relevance for the visual arts, within but not limited to the contemporary South African context. [1]

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Re-reading Malangatana

by Mario Pissarra

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[Note: An edited version of this essay appeared in Farafina #11]

For more than 40 years Malangatana has been one of Mozambique’s best known cultural figures, and indisputably her best known visual artist. Since his first appearance in a group exhibition in Lourenco Marques (now Maputo) in 1959, Malangatana’s works have been shown in numerous countries across the globe. His trademark style – dense compositions contained within shallow pictorial space, consisting of simplified shapes, mostly figurative, often with pronounced eyes and teeth, and typically rendered with a bright palette and bold outlines – is instantly recognisable.

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Accumulated Material: Contemporary Altares and Ofrendas

Jesus Macarena-Avila, 15 August 2006

[This essay was written for an exhibition featuring Giselle A. Mercier, Elvia Rodriguez-Ochoa, and Edra Soto, at Gallery Visio, University of Missouri – St. Louis, USA, curated by Jesus Macarena-Avila, 7-18 November 2006]

INTRODUCTION: RECYCLIA AS TRANSFORMATION

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