Lionel Davis

b. 1936, District Six, Cape Town. Lives in Muizenberg, Cape Town.

A former political prisoner, Lionel Davis’ name features prominently in the history of the Community Arts Project, Vakalisa Art Associates, Thupelo Workshop and Greatmore Artists Studios. Drawing, painting, and printing, and often combining these media, Davis works in visual modes that range from the realist to the abstract. His themes include everyday scenes as well as reflections on black and African identity.

This was initially published online in 2003 (on the Africa Centre’s Contemporary Africa Database, now defunct). It appears here in its original form.
Lionel Davis profile (published at www.africaexpert.org.uk)

Political activist and prisoner turned artist and educator, Lionel Davis cuts a distinct figure in the South African arts and culture landscape. A living archive, he has lived a significant part of his life in or on two of apartheids most notorious symbols, District Six and Robben Island. He has also been closely involved with two key arts organisations, the Community Arts Project (CAP) and the Thupelo Workshop.

It was at an early age growing up in District Six that Davis “became aware of the brutality of police, especially white police, in their attitude to and treatment of people of colour”. Davis says that “this became more of an issue for me, and I always used to stand up for people who were being pushed around. This got me into trouble, and into fights… I was caned once by the police for allegedly hitting a white woman in Woodstock, when I was trying to defend a colleague…”. Aware of the need to educate himself Davis attended night school (on the site where Harold Cressy School now stands), where then in his mid-twenties, he met members of the Non European Unity Movement (NEUM) and began attending political meetings. Davis joined APDUSA (African Peoples Democratic Union of South Africa), an off-shoot of the NEUM, but grew disenchanted with them, describing APDUSA as a “theory shop”. He was part of the core group led by Neville Alexander that broke away from APDUSA to form the Mao Tse Tung inspired National Liberation Front, whose goal was to use arms to overthrow the state. In 1964 he was among a group of eleven that was sentenced to gaol for ‘Conspiring to Commit Sabotage’.

During his seven year sentence Davis completed his schooling by correspondence. Released in 1971 and placed under house arrest he worked as a labourer and then a clerk on building sites, until one day in 1978 he chanced upon CAP, then in infant form. At CAP Davis would go on to play multiple roles for over two decades. From his initial role as cleaner/ handyman/ assistant administrator and student, Davis went on to be a long serving art educator/trainer/ facilitator, specialising in drawing, screen-printing and mural painting, teaching children, youth and adults. He also played a leadership role in CAP: he was elected chairperson in 1988, playing the role of co-ordinator (or acting director); and in the nineties he served two years as a Trustee.

Prior to CAP, Davis’ had no previous art tuition. His art experience was limited to his childhood, drawing cartoon heroes with found materials on the streets and walls of District Six. At CAP he proved to be a diligent student, quickly mastering drawing, the medium that has remained the back-bone to his artistic practice. He was introduced to lino-cut printing by resident artist Mpathi Gocini, who came to CAP via the Evangelical Arts & Crafts Centre in Natal, better known by its location at Rorkes Drift. In 1980 Davis went to Rorkes Drift where he spent two years, returning to Cape Town with a diploma in Fine Arts. It was at Rorkes Drift that Davis learned new graphic techniques and began to appreciate the potential of screen-printing as a medium. His stay there was also important for his artistic development because it brought him into contact with other black artists nationally, paving the way for his later involvement with the Thupelo Workshop.

In 1982 Davis assisted in organising the Cape Town contingent to attend the Culture & Resistance Symposium in Gaborone, organised by the African National Congress (ANC). This is widely regarded as a seminal event which was responsible for recognising the role of artists in cultural resistance, and for shifting the notion of ‘artist’ to that of ‘cultural worker’. A direct outcome of this event was the establishment of a Poster Workshop at CAP. It was here, and its later incarnation as the CAP Media Project that Davis was active for most of the 80s as a screenprint facilitator. Initially most of this work involved producing posters, t-shirts, and banners, much of it political in content. Much of this was done on behalf of political and community organisations, and was frequently banned or confiscated by authorities; whereas his later work for the Media Project entailed training members of community and political organisations to produce their own media.

Davis also played a political role at CAP, especially in countering what he perceived as the hegemonic tendencies of political organisations.Following the launch in 1983 of the United Democratic Front (the internally based resistance movement that was politically aligned to the ANC), there was pressure on CAP to affiliate to the UDF. Similar pressures resurfaced in the late eighties. Davis says of CAP that “[although it] wished to play a political role in the struggle it did not see itself as being party political and made its facilities available to all progressive political tendencies.” He is proud of the role he played in communicating CAP’s non-aligned position to a range of political organisations, especially trade unions and community groupings who may have been alienated, or possibly denied access, by a politically aligned CAP.

In 1987 Davis attended the International Triangle Workshop in New York, an initiative that had given rise to the Thupelo Project a few years earlier. Davis was a Thupelo stalwart, serving as a Trustee for eleven years, and attending no less than nine national workshops between 1986 and 2001. He also attended triangle affiliated workshops in Botswana and Zimbabwe. Thupelo was initially best known for encouraging exploration of materials, and initially this resulted in a mass of abstract paintings. That many black artists abandoned (at least temporarily) more realist modes of working in favour of a painting style and approach that some radical critiques saw as an expression of American cultural imerialism, meant that Thupelo received a mixed reception on the left, whilst being welcomed by establishment voices such as the SA National Gallery’s Marilyn Martin. For many of the artists who were invited to these workshops, Thupelo was undeniably a liberating experience. For Davis, Thupelo was an important part of his exploration of painting, a media to which he had previously had limited access, and he derided his critics claiming that he had never had the opportunities to ‘play’ with art materials, something that was taken for granted as part of (mostly white) privileged children’s development. He also benefitted from Thupelo’s emphasis on scale, and some of his works from Thupelo, such as African Sunset, are among his best known.

Davis also worked as an art educator for the SA National Gallery (SANG), where he was responsible for teaching primary school teachers from the townships to teach art to children. This built on his experience teaching children (in the early eighties) and as media trainer at CAP, as well as the training he undertook (in the nineties) for a diploma from the Curriculum Development Project in teaching teachers to teach art in schools. He also served as a Trustee of the SANG as part of its first ‘democratically constituted’ Board. While the national galleries of Zimbabwe (who have used Davis three times an international ajudicator) and Botswana have bought works from Davis for their collection, the SANG has yet to acquire one of his works.

Davis’ current employer, the Robben Island Museum, has provided him with the unique opportunity to live on the site where he was once imprisoned. Initially employed as a tour guide along with other former political prisoners, Davis is now employed by the Museum as Heritage Educator and does much of his work with secondary school pupils. He plans to retire in three years, when at the ripe age of seventy we can expect his art to bloom like never before. Indeed Davis’ road to becoming an artist has been a much longer one than most other artists. He was 42 when he started classes at CAP and 58 when he graduated as a Fine Artist at UCT. His work has been exhibited in numerous group shows at home and abroad (USA, England, Germany, Greece), but he has never had a solo show. A Lionel Davis retrospective is clearly overdue.

Mario Pissarra

Kunst for alle. by Toril Kojan, 2005.

Overview of all activities - Kunst for alle

 

Life can be different – Learning Cape Festival, 2004.

Life can be different - Learning Cape Festival

 

First Mobil Zimbabwe Heritage Biennale, 1998.

Judging art comp - First Mobil Zimbabwe Heritage Biennale 1998

 

Zimbabwe Heritage, 1997.

Zimbabwe Heritage 1997

 

Zimbabwe Heritage, 1996.

Zimbabwe Heritage 1996

 

Akal – The Congress of South African Writers – August 88 Vol 1, 1988.

Akal - The Congress of South African Writers - August 88 Vol1

 

Ascent arts student’s publication, February 1984.

Ascent - Arts student's publication - February 1984

 

Songs of a New Dawn – Hymn book

Songs of a new dawn - Hymn book

 

Ten Years at Greatmore Studios Cape Town

Ten Years at Greatmore Studios Cape Town

 

 

25 Years of Caversham Press – Artists, Prints , Community. 2011.

25 Years of Caversham Press - Artists, Prints , Community

 

Reflections from Thupelo International Workshop, 2007.

Reflections from Thupelo International Workshop

 

Botaki 3 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2007.

Botaki 3 Exhibition Catalogue

 

Botaki 2 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2005.

Botaki 2 Exhibition Catalogue

 

Botaki 1 – Exhibition Catalogue, 2004.

Botaki Catalogue

 

Upfront and Personal – Three Decades of Political Graphics, 2003.

Upfront and Personal - Three Decades of Political Graphics

 

Cross Currents – Contemporary art practice in South Africa, an exhibition in two parts, 2000.

Cross Currents

 

Thirty minutes – Installation by nine artists, 1997.

Thirty Minutes - Installation by Nine Artists

 

Thapong international artist’s workshop Kenya, 1989.

Thapong International Artist's Workshop - Kenya 1989

 

The Neglected Tradition – Towards a New History of South African art, 1988.

The Neglected Tradition - Towards a new hisory of South African Art

 

Thupelo art workshop, 1986.

Thupelo Art Workshop 1986

 

Art From South Africa, 1990.

Art From South Africa

 

Making Art in Africa 1960-2010, ed. by Polly Savage. Published by Lund Humphries, December 2014.

Making Art in Africa 1960 - 2010

 

Uncontained – Opening the Community Arts Project archive, ed. by Heidi Grunebaum & Emile Maurice. Published by the Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape, 2012.

Uncontained - opening the Community Arts Project archive

 

Triangle: Variety of Experience around Artists’ Workshops and Residencies. Published by Triangle Arts Trust, 2007.

Triangle - Variety of experiences around artist's workshops &

 

Visual culture and public memory in a democratic South Africa, Annie Coombes. Published by Duke University Press Books, 2003.

Visual culture and public memory in a democratic South Africa

 

Shuld…immer nur die anderen. Published by Flensburger Hefte, 2004.

Shuld...immer nur die anderen

 

Turning to one another – Simple conversations to restore hope to the future, Margaret Wheatley. Published by Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2002.

Turning to one another - Simple conversations to restore hope to the future

 

Printmaking in a transforming South Africa, Philipa Hobbs & Elizabeth Rankin. Published by David Krut Bookstores, 1997.

Printmaking in a transforming South Africa

 

Islamic Art and Culture in Sub Saharan Africa, Karin Adahl & Berit Sahlstrom.Published by Uppsala University, 1995.

Islamic Art and Culture in Sub Saharan Africa

 

Art From South African Townships, Gavin Younge. Published by Thames and Hudson, 1988.

Art of the South African Townships - Gavin Younge

 

Echoes of African Art, compiled by Matsemela Manaka. Published by Skotaville Publishers, 1987.

Echoes of African Art

 

Jabula Journal – Rorkes Drift student journal. Published by Rorkes Drift Fine Art School, 1981.

Jabula Journal - Rourkesdrift student journal

 

Until freedom Dawns – Poetry anthology, Frank Meintjies

Until freedom Dawns - Poetry anthology - Frank Meintjies

 

(School Project) – The Significance of CAP in the lives of Sydney Holo and Lionel Davis, Hannah Schultz

School Project - The significane of CAP in the lives of Sydney Holo and Lionel Davis

 

 

awakeningspublicationEdited by Mario Pissarra
Texts by Ayesha Price, Barbara Voss, Bridget Thompson, Deirdre Prins-Solani, Elizabeth Rankin & Philippa Hobbs, Ernestine White, Jacqueline Nolte, Lionel Davis, Patricia de Villiers, Thembinkosi Goniwe and Tina Smith, with introduction by Mario Pissarra, forewords by Bonita Bennett and Premesh Lalu, and preface by Nomusa Makhubu.
Design by Carlos Marzia
Date: 2017
ISBN 978-0-620-77209-9

Click here for more information.

 

 

Art Education

1995: Diploma from the Curriculum Development Project in teaching teachers to teach art in primary schools, Johannesburg, South Africa.
1994: B.A. Fine Arts degree, University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa.
1981: Diploma in Fine Arts Evangelical Lutheran Art and Craft Centre at Rorkes Drift, Kwazulu-Natal.
1978:Community Arts Project (CAP), Cape Town.

Workshops & residencies

2018: Print Access Workshop, Michaelis School of Fine Art, Cape Town.
2015: ASAI In Print, Print Access Workshop Series, Michaelis School of Fine Art, Cape Town.
2013: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2010: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.
2008: Thupelo, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town.

2005: Caversham Press, KZN, South Africa.

2005: Thupelo, AMAC, Cape Town.
2004: Thupelo, Masibambisani School, Cape Town.
2001: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1997: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1995: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1993: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1992: Pachinpamwe Workshop, Zimbabwe.
1991: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1990: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1989: Thapong International Artists workshop, Botswana.
1988: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1987: Thupelo, Cape Town.
1987: Triangle International Artists workshop,Pine Plains, New York, USA.
1986: Thupelo, Cape Town.

Selected Solo Exhibitions

2009: Maskerade, Association of Visual Arts, Cape Town.
2007: Gill Aldermann Galery, Kenilworth, Cape Town.

Selected Group Exhibitions

2018: Feedback: Art, Africa and the 1980s, Iwalewahaus, Bayreuth, Germany
2015: A Labour of Love, Weltkulturen Museum, Frankfurt.
2007: Conversation In Four Parts (with Barbara Voss, Ruth Carneson and Paul Stopforth), Nelson Mandela Gateway, Cape Town.
2004: A Decade of Democracy: South African Art 1994 2004, National Gallery, Cape Town.
1998: Kaapse Lading, Athens, Greece.
1997: Kaapse Lading, Klein Karoo National Arts Festival, Oudtshoorn.
1995: National Gallery, Cape Town.
1994: [Joint SA exhibition], Museum of Modern Art, London, UK.
1994: National Gallery, Cape Town.
1992: Pachipamwe international artists exhibition, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Bulawayo.
1992: Pachipamwe international artists exhibition, The National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare.
1992: South African Black and White 45 years on, Cape Town [organised by British Council].
1988: Neglected Tradition, Johannesburg Art Gallery.
1987: Triangle International Artist exhibition, Pine Plains, Upstate New York, USA.
1987: Johannesburg Art Foundation.
1987: NSA, Durban.
1987: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1986: Kuns Aus Sud Afrika, series of exhibitions in Germany (including Weltkulturen Museum).
1986: Art in our Time, Cape Town.
1986: Thupelo Workshop Exhibition, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.
1984: Second Carnegie Enquiry into Poverty' in SA.
1982: The Culture and Resistance Festival, Gaborone, Botswana.
1982: Art Toward Social Development An Exhibition of SA Art, National Museum and Art Gallery, Gaborone, Botswana.
1981: African Arts Festival, University of Zululand.

Collections

Public collections in South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe.

Public Speaking

2014: Guest speaker at Impressions of Rorke’s Drift, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town.
2014: Guest speaker at Talking Heads, Africa Centre, Cape Town.
2010: Guest speaker with Ahmed Kathrada and Christo Brandt, Freedom Park, Pretoria.
2005: Guest speaker, invited to speak on issues of human rights and colour prejudice, Ontario, Canada.
2002-2003: Guest speaker, invited to speak in multiple platforms such as schools, colleges and national television, Oslo, Norway.
2005: Panelist on human rights conference, University of Connecticut, USA.
1999: Guest speaker at the annual Humor Conference, Saratoga Springs, New York, USA.

Jarrett Erasmus

b. 1984, Cape Town. Lives in Johannesburg.

Erasmus works in various media, focusing on current collaboration while thinking about post apartheid realities and its affects on the social dynamics between communities in South Africa as well as the diaspora.


Education

2017  Masters in Fine Art, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016  ZHdk Summer School programme, Zurich, Switzerland
2007 - 2010  Bachelor of Fine Arts, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
2005 - 2006  Design and Visual art Certificate, Arts and Media Access Centre (AMAC), Cape Town, South Africa
2003 – 2005  Cape Peninsula University of Technology Graphic Design

Projects and Exhibitions

2019  The Main Complaint, group exhibition, Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town, South Africa
2018  Curatorial Care, Humanising Practices conference, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South
Africa
2018  Museum Dialogues conference, Goethe Institut, Windhoek, Namibia
2018  Kewpie, The Daughter of District Six, public art event in collaboration with Gay And Lesbian Memory in Action and District Six Museum, Cape Town, South Africa
2017  Panelist, Any Given Sunday presentation, African Art in Venice Forum, Italy
2016  Re(as)sisting Narratives, group exhibition, District Six Museum, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2016  Foundations and Futures, group exhibition, Bag Factory Arts studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016  Festival D’Art Urbain, Antanarivo, Madagascar
2016  Straatpraatjies, Burning Museum performance, Cape Town, South Africa
2016  Poetry Circle Nowhere workshop, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2015  Empty Ghosts, Public Art project, Johannesburg, South Africa
2015  Artificial Facts: Boundary Objects, group exhibition, Kunsthaus Dresden, Germany (Burning Museum)
2015  Objetos Frontera, CA2M, Madrid, Spain (Burning Museum)
2015  Addressing the Headquarters, presentation, Framer Framed, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Burning Museum)
2015  Cover Version, Gallery MoMo, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2015  Fortunes Remixed, group exhibition. Bag Factory Artist’s Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014  Manufractured, Burning Museum performance, Cape Town, South Africa
2014  Ubuntu Artist Exchange, Studio Museum in Harlem, NY
2014  Plakkers, group exhibition, Brundyn Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2014  Do It, Michaelis Gallery, UCT, Cape Town, South Africa (Burning Museum)
2013  TO LET , Centre For African Studies gallery, UCT, Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Co-Curator, Till it Breaks, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Currency and Curiosity, Joule City Incubator & Research Studio, Cape Town, South Africa
2012  Material Things, solo exhibition, Nafasi Art Space, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2012  S A S, group exhibition, Bag Factory, Johannesburg, South Africa
2011  Mural Painting project at Community House, Salt River
2010  Plures Tectonicus (Many Mansions), Graduate solo exhibition, Albany Natural Sciences Museum Shell Gallery, Grahamstown, South Africa
2006  Mural painting, Artscape Theatre, Cape Town, South Africa

Workshops and Residencies

2018  OpenLab: The Art of Making, artists residency, Richmond, South Africa
2015: ASAI In Print, Print Access Workshop Series, Michaelis School of Fine Art, Cape Town.
2014  Thupelo Artist’s Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa
2014  Arts Aweh Ambassadors programme (facilitator), Cape Town, South Africa
2013  Resident artist, Greatmore Studios, Cape Town, South Africa
2012 Cyan Development Concepts creative development workshops (teacher), Cape Town, South Africa
2012  Visiting Artist Residency, Through the lens: Drawing workshop, NAFASI Art Space, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2012  Visiting Artist Residency, Bag Factory Artist’s Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa
2012  Artist's workshop, Thupelo, Cape Town, South Africa
2011  Participant and facilitator, Koekenaap artists workshop, Matzikama District, South Africa

 

Awards and Academic achievements

2013  Business and Arts administrative certificate
2012  David Koloane Award
2011  Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (Painting), Masters Degree Scholarship

Experience

2017 - present  Sessional Lecturer, Visual Arts, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014  Infecting the City Festival High Schools programme, South Africa
2013 – 2014  Researcher and Digital archivist, Africa South Art Initiative (ASAI), Cape Town, South Africa
2010 – 2012  Facilitator, Cyan Development Concepts community arts and creative development workshops, Cape Town, South Africa
2009 – 2010 Intern, Artb Gallery, Bellville, South Africa

Assistant (N.R.F. internship), Visual Art undergraduate programme, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
Production Assistant, VOLTA Art Fair, Art Basel, Switzerland
Board member, Thupelo Artists Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa